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Today's News

ISHN delivers breaking news, just-released reports and other current EHS developments to help professionals stay informed.

A Tulsa, Oklahoma safety services company doesn’t just talk the talk. Having just achieved one million man-hours without a recordable injury, JCL Service Company apparently walks the walk, too. Both divisions of the JCL company—JCL Safety Services and JCL Risk Services—reached this safety milestone by completing over one million man-hours without any of the following injury-related incidents occurring: days off work, restricted work, transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, loss of consciousness, or an injury resulting in death.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 7:00 pm
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has determined that the operator of a drone that collided with an U.S. Army helicopter failed to see and avoid the helicopter because he was intentionally flying the drone out of visual range and did not have adequate knowledge of regulations and safe operating practices.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 3:00 pm
Major or “large-loss” fires in the U.S. in 2016 cost $1.2 billion in property losses and resulted in 14 deaths and dozens of injuries, according to the latest edition of the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) “Large-loss Fires in the United States” report. Large-loss fires are defined as events that result in property damage of at least $10 million.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Carl Cannon Inc., an automobile dealership, for serious safety violations after three employees died and two were injured at its Jasper facility. OSHA initiated an investigation in response to a flash fire. Inspectors determined that the employees were using a flammable brake wash to scrub the service pit floor when the fire occurred. As a result, three employees were fatally injured, and a fourth was critically burned. A fifth employee was treated for smoke inhalation and released.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 7:00 pm
COSHCON17 — The Young and the Active — The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, the umbrella group of all the nation’s COSH groups held its annual conference last week and I was privileged to be able to chair a very moving panel on “Lessons from Workplace Fatalities” with some of my heroes: family activist Katherine Rodriguez, whose father, Ray Gonzales was killed in a fire at BP Texas City in 2004, Tonya Ford, director the United Support and Memorial for Workplace Fatalities, whose uncle Robert “Bobby” Fitch fell to his death at an Archer Daniel Midland plant in 2009, and Jonathan Karmel, author of Dying to Work: Death and Injury in the American Workplace.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 3:00 pm
The deadliest shipping disaster involving a U.S.-flagged vessel in more than 30 years was caused by a captain’s failure to avoid sailing into a hurricane despite numerous opportunities to route a course away from hazardous weather, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) announced during a public meeting Tuesday. The cargo vessel S.S. El Faro sank Oct. 1, 2015, in the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Joaquin, taking the lives of all 33 aboard.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 5:00 am
Each holiday season for the past several years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has received reports from pilots who said they were distracted or temporarily blinded by residential laser-light displays. The FAA's concerns about lasers – regardless of the source – is that they not be aimed at aircraft in a way that can threaten the safety of a flight by distracting or blinding the pilots.
Posted: December 13, 2017, 5:00 pm
The 62,085 injuries to U.S. firefighters in 2016 reflected an 8.8 percent decrease from 2015, making this the lowest rate of injury since 1981 – the year the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) began analyzing firefighter injury data. The latest data from the NFPA, released as part of the latest edition of its “U.S. Firefighter Injuries” report, show that the leading injury types in 2016 were: Strains, sprains and/or muscular pains (52.6 percent), and wounds, cuts, bleeding, and bruising (15.2 percent).
Posted: December 13, 2017, 3:00 pm
The American Industrial Hygiene Association’s (AIHA) Board of Directors has approved a slate of public policy priorities for 2018 and also established a permanent government relations working group. New public policy priorities for 2018 fall under the following topics: hazards (such as beryllium, silica, and first responder exposure to opioids), assessments (including hazard banding, sensors, and teen workplace safety), and profession (IH Professional Pathways and title protection).
Posted: December 12, 2017, 7:00 pm
An arc flash at the Panda Power station in south Sherman, Texas, sent one employee to the hospital. Sherman Fire says It happened around 7:30 a.m. at 510 Progress Drive in Sherman. The Panda Sherman Power Project is a clean natural gas-fueled, 758-megawatt combined-cycle generating facility. The plant can supply the power needs of up to 750,000 homes.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 pm
Zach Spicer, a substation supervisor for DES, Dickson County, Tenn., suffered second-degree burns to his face and neck and third-degree burns Aug. 25 afternoon on his hands and forearm at the DES Old White Bluff Substation just as he prepared to teach a class. He was accessing a breaker cabinet, high voltage side when contact or an arc formed, causing an electrical fault that released heat and energy.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 3:00 pm
A new compilation of articles published in the November issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, describes an effort led by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop and evaluate clinical decision support (CDS) designed to assist primary care clinicians’ with care of their working patients using CDS tools in electronic health records.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
Methylene chloride kills. We wrote about 21-year old Kevin Hartley last June. He died last April 29 — Workers Memorial Day — while when he was overcome by methylene chloride while stripping a bath tub. Seventeen workers have died from over-exposure to methylene chloride between 2000 and 2015, and probably at least as many consumers. “Methylene chloride is too dangerous to keep on the store shelves,” said Dr. Robert Harrison of the University of California San Francisco. He says in a small room, just a half gallon’s worth of product containing that chemical can lead to a buildup of vapors that can prove lethal in less than an hour.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 7:00 pm
R.C. Bigelow ("Bigelow") is a family-owned company headquartered in Fairfield, Connecticut, that produces and markets blended teas. The company was founded in 1945 by Ruth Campbell Bigelow, who started her company with "Constant Comment" blended tea, which remains popular today. The R.C. Bigelow facility in Boise, Idaho, is one of two bagging, packaging, and distribution facilities. The company employs approximately 60 workers at the Boise facility and 320 corporate-wide.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 5:00 am
OK, now that the dust has settled, what do we think about the performance of OSHA Assistant Secretary nominee Scott Mugno after listening to his testimony at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday (and Tweeting it)? Two days after the hearing, there hasn’t been much press coverage. Business Insurance headlined its article “OSHA director nominee faces tough questions at confirmation hearing,” noting Ranking Member Patty Murray’s concern that “Your record that stands against everything OSHA should stand for.”
Posted: December 8, 2017, 5:00 pm
The wildfires raging throughout Southern California right now are taking life, destroying property, and endangering people who are tasked with performing response and recovery operations. During a wildfire, workers may be caught in circumstances that require them to quickly evacuate. The Ready.gov - Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) website offers guidance on what to do during a wildfire if in a vehicle, in a residence, or out in the open.
Posted: December 8, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Benco Builders of the Virginias Inc. for multiple safety hazards, including lack of fall protection, after an employee suffered serious injuries from a 19-foot fall off a roof. The Princeton, West Virginia-based contractor faces proposed penalties totaling $86,916. After inspecting a work site where Benco was the general contractor responsible for demolishing an existing structure and constructing two steel/metal buildings, OSHA issued a willful citation for failure to provide and require employees to wear fall protection during roofing work.
Posted: December 7, 2017, 3:00 pm
It appears a welding accident lead to a deadly fire in Clovis, New Mexico. Three people were killed one was seriously injured. “This is one of the largest losses of life we’ve seen,” said Clovis Police Captain Roman Romero. The three deceased are John Sandoval, 54; Robert Elebario, 51; and Billie Grabowsky, 52. Rogelio Hernandez was the only one who survived the fire. He was treated at Plains Regional Medical Center in Clovis. “I asked him what happened and what does he remember, and he said they were just in the shop welding a piece of pipe to a car and they noticed the gas can nearby had caught a spark,” explained Rogelio’s niece, Casandra Hernandez.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 3:00 pm
What’s the best way to avoid the flu? You hate needles, so should you get that flu vaccine that comes in a nasal spray? Or how about that new kind of vaccine that may also be given without a needle? And will the type of vaccine that’s available during the 2017-2018 flu season be effective against whatever variant of the bug makes an appearance this time around? Fortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and OSHA have all of the information you need to protect yourself – and your workplace – from the flu.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am

Engine failure on an American Airlines plane that resulted in serious injuries to a passenger and substantial damage to the aircraft will be the subject of a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) meeting on Jan. 23, 2018. The Boeing 767-300 experienced an uncontained failure of the right engine during the take-off roll at Chicago O’Hare International Airport.

Posted: December 5, 2017, 7:00 pm

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals last week dismissed an appeal by CONSOL Energy that sought to overturn a federal judge’s decision requiring CONSOL to continue paying for health care benefits to some 3,400 retired miners, their dependents and widows. Judge David A. Faber of the Federal Court for Southern West Virginia in Bluefield found CONSOL was attempting to violate a collective bargaining agreement requirement to pay for lifetime health care benefits for retirees.

Posted: December 4, 2017, 7:00 pm
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published new data today showing a record-high 221.7 million licensed drivers in the U.S. in 2016, including 41.7 million – or almost one in five – who are 65 years or older. This age group is growing faster than any other, and is far outpacing their teenage counterparts. The largest single-year percentage increase in licensed drivers that year was among those who are between 75-79 years old, increasing by 4.98 percent over the previous year. Except for five states – Michigan, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wyoming – the nation saw increases among licensed drivers in 2016 compared to the previous year.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 7:00 pm
Substandard conditions in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey have impacted workers’ health and safety on the job, as well as their wages according to a devastating new report from from the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) and University of Illinois Chicago that surveyed 360 workers. The report also offers recommendations for improving working conditions during post-disaster recovery operations. Hurricanes and other disasters present a major challenge for OSHA and other local and national government agencies dedicated to protecting workers during recovery operations.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 5:00 pm
A Pennsylvania company willfully exposed its workers to confined space and fall hazards, according to OSHA, which has assessed US Environmental Inc. proposed penalties of $333,756 for a dozen safety violations. The Downingtown company is an integrated industrial energy services firm that serves the energy, petroleum, natural gas, petro-chemical, power, chemical, manufacturing and engineering sectors. Investigators inspected the facility on May 31, 2017, and found that the company failed to implement rescue procedures for employees in confined spaces; provide protective equipment when working in confined spaces; and provide employees with fall protection training and equipment.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 3:00 pm
Changes to school meals proposed this week by the Trump administration are getting praised by school nutritionists and slammed by health experts. Among other things, the interim final rule released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) allows schools to avoid reducing sodium levels in breakfasts and lunches – a mandate introduced by former President Barack Obama. Sodium reduction was to take place in stages through the year 2022.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 7:00 pm
Scott Mugno, President Trump’s choice to head the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, will go before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee next Tuesday at 10:00 am for his confirmation hearing. Mugno is Vice President for Safety, Sustainability and Vehicle Maintenance at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh and was formerly Managing Director for FedEx Express Corporate Safety, Health and Fire Protection in Memphis. You can watch it LIVE here.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 pm
The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) is seeking a new Executive Director (ED), a position based in Park Ridge, Illinois and one that reports to the organization’s President and its Board of Directors. Founded in 1911, ASSE has a global membership of more than 36,000 safety, health and environmental practitioners worldwide. ASSE advocates on behalf of its members while also providing robust professional development, training and networking opportunities. ASSE has an annual budget of approximately $18M, staff of 75, and operates a robust network of 152 chapters in the United States and internationally.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 2:00 pm
OSHA and Marshall Pottery, Inc. in Marshall, Texas have reached a settlement agreement including a penalty of $545,160, after the death of an assistant plant manager. On April 16, 2017, investigators determined that the manager was servicing a kiln and became trapped inside when it activated.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 am
A traffic accident in Brooklyn, New York last week took the life of a young worker and forever changed that of the driver who killed him. News sources reported that 14-year-old Edwin Ajacalon, who was making restaurant deliveries on his bicycle, was struck by a car and killed on Saturday evening.
Posted: November 29, 2017, 7:00 pm
Anti-smoking groups, frustrated by federal inaction on restricting menthol cigarettes, are taking matters into their own hands. In recent months, cities ranging from Oakland and Los Gatos, Calif., to Minneapolis and St. Paul have passed laws limiting the availability of menthol cigarettes, which health advocates say have a particular appeal to beginning smokers. St. Paul is the latest, voting this month to restrict sales to adult-only tobacco and liquor stores.
Posted: November 29, 2017, 5:00 pm

Compliance

Learn about OSHA, EPA, MSHA, NFPA, and ISO standards / enforcement, other U.S. regulators and state / local regulators.

OSHA has cited Carl Cannon Inc., an automobile dealership, for serious safety violations after three employees died and two were injured at its Jasper facility. OSHA initiated an investigation in response to a flash fire. Inspectors determined that the employees were using a flammable brake wash to scrub the service pit floor when the fire occurred. As a result, three employees were fatally injured, and a fourth was critically burned. A fifth employee was treated for smoke inhalation and released.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 7:00 pm
OSHA has cited Benco Builders of the Virginias Inc. for multiple safety hazards, including lack of fall protection, after an employee suffered serious injuries from a 19-foot fall off a roof. The Princeton, West Virginia-based contractor faces proposed penalties totaling $86,916. After inspecting a work site where Benco was the general contractor responsible for demolishing an existing structure and constructing two steel/metal buildings, OSHA issued a willful citation for failure to provide and require employees to wear fall protection during roofing work.
Posted: December 7, 2017, 3:00 pm

This article by Elizabeth Floyd Mair of the Altamont Enterprise is a rare summary of a court case involving an employer challenge of an OSHA citation related to the gruesome death of a day laborer who was dragged into a wood-chipper on May 4, 2016. The employer, Tony Watson, owner of Countryside Tree Care, is contesting citations totaling $141,811 related to the death of Justus Booze, a 23-year old day laborer halfway through his first day on the job.

Posted: December 4, 2017, 3:00 pm
A Pennsylvania company willfully exposed its workers to confined space and fall hazards, according to OSHA, which has assessed US Environmental Inc. proposed penalties of $333,756 for a dozen safety violations. The Downingtown company is an integrated industrial energy services firm that serves the energy, petroleum, natural gas, petro-chemical, power, chemical, manufacturing and engineering sectors. Investigators inspected the facility on May 31, 2017, and found that the company failed to implement rescue procedures for employees in confined spaces; provide protective equipment when working in confined spaces; and provide employees with fall protection training and equipment.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 3:00 pm
OSHA and Marshall Pottery, Inc. in Marshall, Texas have reached a settlement agreement including a penalty of $545,160, after the death of an assistant plant manager. On April 16, 2017, investigators determined that the manager was servicing a kiln and became trapped inside when it activated.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Tampa Electric Co. and Critical Intervention Services, a security services provider, for $43,458 in total proposed penalties, following a release of anhydrous ammonia – a chemical refrigerant – at its Gibsonton facility. OSHA responded to the incident on May 23, 2017 and determined that the ammonia release occurred when a relief valve activated after a pipeline became over pressurized. As a result, four workers were taken to the hospital for observation and released.
Posted: November 23, 2017, 5:00 am

OSHA is proposing nearly two million dollars in fines against a Wisconsin corn milling facility, after five employees were killed in 12 others injured in a grain dust explosion. Among those injured in the May 31, 2017 accident at Didion Milling, Inc.: a 21-year-old employee who suffered a double leg amputation after being crushed by a railcar. OSHA found that the explosion likely resulted from Didion’s failures to correct the leakage and accumulation of highly combustible grain dust throughout the facility and to properly maintain equipment to control ignition sources.

Posted: November 21, 2017, 7:00 pm
Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta testified last Thursday at a hearing before the full House Education and Workforce Committee, and although I take great pleasure in (deservedly) criticizing Trump administration appointees, he wasn’t terrible — as Trump appointees go. Now let me qualify a bit. I’m focusing only on workplace safety issues, not on any wage and hour, apprenticeship or other labor issues that were addressed during the hearing. Second, his performance varied from fairly decent (regarding enforcement issues) to pretty bad (regarding standard setting and staffing.) 
Posted: November 20, 2017, 8:00 pm
Severe burns to a worker have resulted in safety citations being issued to a Montana general contractor and a Wyoming contractor, according to OSHA, which is proposing $249,516 against the two companies. On May 5, 2017, a Coleman Construction Inc. employee suffered third-degree burns when compressed oxygen inside an underground duct caused a fire. The subcontractor was cited for failing to provide mechanical ventilation or an underground air monitoring system, and failing to report the hospitalization of the burned employee in a timely manner. The company faces $189,762 in penalties.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 5:00 pm
An Aberdeen lumber mill has been fined $112,000 for safety violations following the death of a worker last April. Andrew Ward, 41, died when he fell from an elevated platform where he was working to the concrete surface below. An investigation by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) has found and cited Sierra Pacific Industries for seven safety violations at the lumber mill where the incident happened.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 3:00 pm
OSHA inspectors found numerous hazards at an auto auction facility, after an accident that claimed the lives of five people. The tragedy at Lynnway Auto Auction Inc. occurred on May 3, 2017, when five people died of their injuries after being struck by a sport utility vehicle. The agency issued 16 citations to the company for motor vehicle hazards, blocked exit routes, violations of the hazard communication standard, and recordkeeping deficiencies.
Posted: November 16, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Anderson Foot and Ankle Clinic for potentially exposing employees to infectious materials, and for violations of the hazard communication standard. The agency proposed penalties totaling $93,074. OSHA inspectors cited the Rolla-based podiatry clinic for improperly handling medical waste, failing to review the exposure control plan annually, and failing to provide vaccines for employees exposed to bloodborne pathogens. The clinic also was cited for failing to update safety data sheets, and for lacking a list of hazardous chemicals used in the workplace.
Posted: November 13, 2017, 5:00 am
A Nebraska worker barely escaped with his life after being trapped in a bin at a grain-handling cooperative. The incident occurred in May 2017 when the Farmers Cooperative employee had entered the bin to clear clumps of soybeans while the auger was running. As the clumped beans cleared, the grain shifted and knocked the worker off of his feet. The auger drew the cleared beans to the bottom of the bin and engulfed the worker up to his chest.
Posted: November 10, 2017, 3:00 pm
Two serious injuries to workers – including an amputation of a left index finger -- brought OSHA investigators to an auto parts manufacturing facility in Buford, Georgia. The agency subsequently cited Elringklinger USA Inc. for exposing workers to electrical, fall, and noise hazards. Proposed penalties total $308,906. OSHA inspected Elringklinger USA on May 2, 2017, after an employee performing maintenance on a screen print machine was injured.
Posted: November 8, 2017, 5:00 pm

While most industrial facilities offer hearing protection to their employees, there are some very basic, yet overlooked, questions you can ask of your hearing conservation program (HCP) to determine if you are maximizing its effectiveness.

Posted: November 7, 2017, 5:00 am
The man likely to become the next head of OSHA will first have to face a Senate review process – and safety advocacy groups like National Council for Occupational Safety and Health (National COSH) have some ideas about the topics that should be covered during those sessions. Scott Mugno, vice president for safety, sustainability and vehicle maintenance at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh, Pa.. has been nominated by President Trump to lead the agency.
Posted: November 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

Employers continue to struggle with identifying and communicating hazards posed by dangerous chemicals. Fortunately, they can take steps toward complying with HazCom 2012 and GHS standards with simple, effective visual communication tools.

Posted: November 2, 2017, 4:00 am
OSHA has cited a Pittsburgh masonry contractor for exposing workers to serious dangers including fall and electrical hazards after an employee was fatally electrocuted in April. The 21-year-old laborer was doing restoration work at a Pittsburgh residence when he was electrocuted. A subsequent investigation of the man’s employer, Ski Masonry LLC, resulted in two willful and five serious citations for violations against the company.
Posted: October 30, 2017, 2:00 pm
OSHA has again cited a Moonachie, New Jersey hair distribution company, and proposed $181,280 in penalties, after finding continued safety hazards at the employer's warehouse. The agency initiated an inspection of Mane Concept’s facility in April after receiving a complaint alleging imminent safety hazards.
Posted: October 26, 2017, 4:00 pm
Workers at a Birmingham, Alabama framing company were wearing fall protection harnesses when OSHA inspectors visited the sight, but the harnesses were not tied off to prevent a fall. Structural Subcontractors Service, LLC was cited for exposing workers to fall hazards and faces proposed penalties totaling $102,669.
Posted: October 24, 2017, 4:00 am
A South Jersey construction company owner with a long history of workplace safety violations was cited by OSHA for exposing workers to serious scaffold hazards at a job site in Philadelphia. The owner, Vyacheslav Leshko faces $191,215 in proposed penalties. OSHA inspectors responded to a complaint of unsafe working conditions at DH Construction LLC., and discovered employees performing masonry and bricklaying while working on a scaffold that was dangerously close to power lines.
Posted: October 23, 2017, 4:00 am
OSHA has cited the owner of a South Jersey construction company for exposing workers to serious scaffold hazards at a job site in Philadelphia. Inspectors found employees performing work using a scaffold that was dangerously close to power lines.
Posted: October 19, 2017, 4:00 am
OSHA – which had ceased most programmed enforcement actions following Hurricane Harvey -- resumed normal enforcement throughout Texas and Louisiana on Tuesday.
Posted: October 12, 2017, 4:00 am

A Virginia air conditioning company faces $225,995 in penalties after a worker plunged to his death at one of its worksites. The man was an employee of a Whitley/Service Roofing and Sheet Metal Company.

Posted: October 3, 2017, 6:00 pm
One of the free services we provide here at Confined Space world headquarter is helping journalists write better articles. Here we have a news outlet doing the right thing: “News4 I-Team’s Lindsay Bramson started watching construction sites after learning 12 construction workers have died in the past two years.”
Posted: September 27, 2017, 4:00 pm
Four separate reports of workers suffering life-changing injuries brought OSHA inspectors to a Chicago manufacturing company, where they found multiple safety violations.
Posted: September 27, 2017, 2:00 pm
While OSHA’s Top 10 list of most frequently cited workplace safety violations is usually filled with familiar violations names, this year’s rundown contains a newcomer: Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503).
Posted: September 26, 2017, 4:00 pm
The employer of a worker who was struck and killed by a moving spindle failed to identify and correct machinery hazards in its facility, according to California OSHA, which has issued five citations against Aero Pacific Corp.
Posted: September 19, 2017, 2:00 pm

More organizations are abandoning paper-based health and safety management, and purchasing software to achieve leading indicator-based health and safety potential. The biggest mistake organizations make is believing that by a flip of the switch, health and safety software will solve all issues.

Posted: September 19, 2017, 4:00 am
OSHA has engaged in a furious flurry of press activity over the past month. Well, “furious” by Trump-OSHA standards. By anyone else’s standards, it’s still pathetic. OSHA has issued an astonishing total of six press releases since the beginning of August.
Posted: September 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

Safety in the Construction Industry

Safety in the Construction Industry covers fall protection, PPE, regulations and best practices.

Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta testified last Thursday at a hearing before the full House Education and Workforce Committee, and although I take great pleasure in (deservedly) criticizing Trump administration appointees, he wasn’t terrible — as Trump appointees go. Now let me qualify a bit. I’m focusing only on workplace safety issues, not on any wage and hour, apprenticeship or other labor issues that were addressed during the hearing. Second, his performance varied from fairly decent (regarding enforcement issues) to pretty bad (regarding standard setting and staffing.) 
Posted: November 20, 2017, 8:00 pm
Mixing concrete in order to understand how materials and their proportions influence the properties of concrete is an example of the hands-on training that will be offered at WOW, held Jan. 23-26 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am
Engineers, consultants, company owners, concrete producers and contractors can learn about effective ways to manage cracks and mitigate shrinkage in a World of Concrete presentation entitled: Innovations in Concrete: Crack Reduction & 3D Printing of Construction Materials. Attendees will learn about the industrialization of the 3D printing process for construction materials and see case study project examples where shrinkage reducing / compensating admixtures were successfully utilized.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am

Among the exhibitions in the World of World of Concrete New Product Zone will be some that are a bit larger than what you normally see at trade shows. In the Material Handling area in the Central Hall, for instance, attendees will get a close look at trucks and excavators used for material delivery, distribution, concrete placement, and earth moving. More large equipment used in surface preparation, scarifying, grinding, sawing and demolition will be found in the Concrete Repair & Demolition that will be housed in the South Hall.

Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am
The hour-and-a-half long seminars held during World of Concrete are crash courses, in business, the basics of concrete (for entry level personnel) and in topics like engineering, masonry, residential construction, safety and risk management and technical updates.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am
Concrete professionals, builders, architects and others will see how decorative concrete can be used in retail space in an enormous exhibit at World of Concrete called Decorative Concrete LIVE! Consisting of four individual buildings encompassing a plaza complete with a made-on-site concrete fountain, the display measures 78 feet long by 55 feet wide – nearly 4,300-square-foot retail space.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am
An elevator ride down 530 feet through a rock wall and a guided tour of a tunnel drilled in the 1930s will be among the activities offering during World of Concrete – those two as part of the Hoover Dam & Bypass Bridge Tour. Rick Yelton, World of Concrete’s Editor at Large will conduct the visit to two of the world’s most famous concrete structures, and share information on how these concrete structures, built more than 50 years apart, played an important part in the development of new standards in concrete construction.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA) last week issued a final rule setting November 10, 2018, as the date for employers in the construction industries to comply with a requirement for crane operator certification. The final rule becomes effective November 9, 2017.
Posted: November 14, 2017, 5:00 pm

Fall prevention and protection is a primary focus of construction industry safety programs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the number one cause of construction-worker fatalities, accounting for one-third of on-the-job injury deaths in the industry.

Posted: November 8, 2017, 5:00 am
A 22-year-old worker died last week in Streamwood, Illinois after becoming trapped in a manhole. Authorities say Brett Morrow was part of a construction crew working to clean out and install lining in a sanitary sewer system. He was about 30 feet into a two foot-wide pipe when he became trapped. According to news sources, firefighters crawled down through the pipe, but had trouble reaching Morrow because of a large quantity of hardened lining material that was blocking the pipe.
Posted: November 1, 2017, 2:00 pm
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) often called drones are increasingly used for military, recreational, public, and commercial purposes. UAVs have the potential to prevent injury and death in the construction industry where nearly 1,000 workers died in 2015. Advancements in UAV technology could help reduce construction-related injury and death from falls, toxic chemical exposures, electrical hazards, or traumatic injury from vehicle and equipment collisions.
Posted: October 26, 2017, 4:00 am
Workers at a Birmingham, Alabama framing company were wearing fall protection harnesses when OSHA inspectors visited the sight, but the harnesses were not tied off to prevent a fall. Structural Subcontractors Service, LLC was cited for exposing workers to fall hazards and faces proposed penalties totaling $102,669.
Posted: October 24, 2017, 4:00 am

Six construction workers were injured last week – four seriously – at a Brooklyn, New York worksite. According to news sources, the injuries occurred when a two-story brick building that was under construction collapsed after a load of cinder blocks was placed on its roof.

Posted: October 23, 2017, 4:00 pm
A South Jersey construction company owner with a long history of workplace safety violations was cited by OSHA for exposing workers to serious scaffold hazards at a job site in Philadelphia. The owner, Vyacheslav Leshko faces $191,215 in proposed penalties. OSHA inspectors responded to a complaint of unsafe working conditions at DH Construction LLC., and discovered employees performing masonry and bricklaying while working on a scaffold that was dangerously close to power lines.
Posted: October 23, 2017, 4:00 am
Start planning now. The 2018 National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls will be held May 7-11. The Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Employers are encouraged to take a break during the event and focus on fall hazards and and fall prevention.
Posted: October 20, 2017, 2:00 pm
Improving the safety performance of both employees and contractors was identified as a top priority for driving organization's contractor management goals, according to a recent Contractor Management Survey by ISN, a global leader in contractor and supplier information management.
Posted: October 20, 2017, 4:00 am
Some robots may do the majority of back-breaking work for construction workers that repeat the same routine for hours. The Hadrian X is a bricklaying robot courtesy Australia's Fastbrick Robotics, which uses its 30-metre metal arm to lay bricks at a rate of 1,000 bricks per hour, compared to a human worker's average of 1,000 a day.
Posted: October 10, 2017, 2:00 pm
In a finding that could have special significance for smaller construction firms, researchers have determined that insurance loss prevention (LP) representatives – who are often a low or no-cost benefit for insurance policyholders – can help reduce the overall incidence of lost-time injuries.
Posted: October 5, 2017, 2:00 pm
A move last week by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) will delay enforcement of OSHA’s silica rule for the construction industry for another 30 days – to Oct. 23. The DOL said the delay was necessary because of the “dramatic” reduction in the exposure limit – from 250 to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, averaged over an eight-hour shift.
Posted: September 28, 2017, 2:00 pm
Two New York City construction workers at two different worksites plunged to their deaths and another was seriously injured Thursday – a day after the City Council approved a controversial construction safety bill.
Posted: September 25, 2017, 4:00 pm
The National Safety Council recently released a new report, “Making the Case for Contractor Management: Examining the Safety Benefits of 3rd-Party Management.”
Posted: September 24, 2017, 4:00 am
Construction workers all day long lift and heave, carry and climb, twisting their bodies into awkward positions to reach corners and ceilings. They scale walls. They work on rooftops, perched on support beams or thin ladders. These people definitely have more than their fair share of foot problems.
Posted: September 18, 2017, 4:00 am
Florida’s construction cranes weathered Hurricane Irma better than expected, although three massive cranes did collapse in the southern part of the state after being battered by 120 mph winds and heavy rain. There were no injuries reported from the crane incidents.
Posted: September 11, 2017, 2:00 pm
The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) is issuing grants, OSHA is suspending enforcement activity and federal contractor requirements are being waived, all in an effort to assist with and expedite post-Harvey recovery efforts.
Posted: September 5, 2017, 2:00 pm
In an increasingly familiar scenario, OSHA is considering pushing a regulatory compliance date forward into the future in order to “address stakeholder concerns.”
Posted: September 1, 2017, 4:00 pm
Construction activity in the southern United States is booming. In Texas and Tennessee alone, construction now generates more dollars annually than it did before the Great Recession. In Florida, Georgia, and North Carolina, construction spending is rapidly approaching pre-recession levels.
Posted: September 1, 2017, 4:00 am
OSHA has again cited a North Florida roofing contractor for failing to protect its workers from the risks of dangerous falls and other hazards at two St. Augustine work sites.
Posted: August 14, 2017, 6:00 pm
Nail guns are used every day on many construction jobs. They boost productivity but also cause tens of thousands of serious injuries each year. Nail gun injuries are common - one study found that 2 out of 5 residential carpenter apprentices experienced a nail gun injury over a four-year period.
Posted: August 13, 2017, 4:00 am
Ten years ago the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) launched the concept of Prevention through Design (PtD), which champions preventing and controlling occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by “designing out” or minimizing hazards and risks.
Posted: August 2, 2017, 4:00 am
The most common accidents reported from construction sites, named the “Fatal Four” by OSHA, were responsible for 64.2 percent of construction worker deaths in 2015: falls, struck by an object (“injuries produced by forcible contact or impact between the injured person and an object or piece of equipment”), electrocution, and caught-in or –between hazards (can-ins, pulled into machinery, crushed by two pieces of machinery, etc.).
Posted: July 26, 2017, 2:00 pm

Facility Safety

This topic deals with machine guarding, housekeeping,forklift safety,showers & eyewashes,LOTO, flooring, fire safety, security, and emergency response.

Major or “large-loss” fires in the U.S. in 2016 cost $1.2 billion in property losses and resulted in 14 deaths and dozens of injuries, according to the latest edition of the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) “Large-loss Fires in the United States” report. Large-loss fires are defined as events that result in property damage of at least $10 million.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 5:00 am

Workers who perform hot work can quickly become complacent. They don’t realize that simply “pencil whipping” the permit without making the area safe for hot work can place them and their coworkers at risk.

Posted: December 15, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Carl Cannon Inc., an automobile dealership, for serious safety violations after three employees died and two were injured at its Jasper facility. OSHA initiated an investigation in response to a flash fire. Inspectors determined that the employees were using a flammable brake wash to scrub the service pit floor when the fire occurred. As a result, three employees were fatally injured, and a fourth was critically burned. A fifth employee was treated for smoke inhalation and released.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 7:00 pm
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has unveiled its annual Winter Alert campaign, reminding miners and mine operators of the increased hazards that colder weather creates at both surface and underground coal mines. The Winter Alert campaign, which runs each year through March, emphasizes increased vigilance and adherence to safety principles during the winter months, when cold temperatures increase hazards for miners.
Posted: December 13, 2017, 5:00 am

There are more than 100 different ways to weld metals together. With so many different ways to weld, types of metals, and filler materials comes many hazards such as flying particles, harmful dust, smoke, fumes, heat and light radiation.

Posted: December 13, 2017, 5:00 am

Metalworking facilities and welding shops must be diligent in controlling dust and fumes containing harmful metal particulate. Fortunately, there are proven controls to maintain a healthy work environment.

Posted: December 11, 2017, 5:00 am

In addition to long-term damage, OSHA warns that excessive noise can cause physical and psychological stress, reduce productivity, interfere with communication and concentration, and contribute to workplace accidents and injuries.

Posted: December 5, 2017, 5:00 am

Unfortunately, as with many OSHA requirements, they inform you “what” to do, but not “how” do it, and leave this part up to the employer. The challenge for many employers is the lack of knowledge or experience to effectively implement the OSHA lockout guidelines.

Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 am
One person was killed and approximately three dozen injured in an explosion and fire last week at a cosmetics factory in New York state. Seven of the injured were firefighters who were inside the facility, responding to a first blast, when a second explosion occurred.
Posted: November 28, 2017, 5:00 pm

OSHA is proposing nearly two million dollars in fines against a Wisconsin corn milling facility, after five employees were killed in 12 others injured in a grain dust explosion. Among those injured in the May 31, 2017 accident at Didion Milling, Inc.: a 21-year-old employee who suffered a double leg amputation after being crushed by a railcar. OSHA found that the explosion likely resulted from Didion’s failures to correct the leakage and accumulation of highly combustible grain dust throughout the facility and to properly maintain equipment to control ignition sources.

Posted: November 21, 2017, 7:00 pm
In the flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey in August, the water rose so rapidly at the Arkema chemical plant in Crosby, Texas site that the first combustion occurred less than 72 hours after flooding commenced. The backup generators at Arkema were elevated 2 feet off the ground, but the flooding exceeded 3 feet in the vicinity of the generators. In short, says the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB), the facility was not prepared for such heavy rainfall and such a rapid flood rate. When the floodwaters knocked out power to the plant’s refrigerators, leaving the organic peroxides and volatile chemicals stores at the plant at risk of heating up, Arkema employees moved the peroxides to refrigerated trailers. But the waters kept rising, forcing the evacuation of the workers and ultimately flooding the trailers.
Posted: November 16, 2017, 7:00 pm
OSHA inspectors found numerous hazards at an auto auction facility, after an accident that claimed the lives of five people. The tragedy at Lynnway Auto Auction Inc. occurred on May 3, 2017, when five people died of their injuries after being struck by a sport utility vehicle. The agency issued 16 citations to the company for motor vehicle hazards, blocked exit routes, violations of the hazard communication standard, and recordkeeping deficiencies.
Posted: November 16, 2017, 5:00 am

When designing and laying out the piping loop for a recirculating tepid water system for a series of emergency showers, there are a number of important items to consider to maximize the performance and minimize the cost of the required tepid water delivery system.

Posted: November 15, 2017, 5:00 am

One manufacturing company implemented a new fume collection system to not only improve working conditions for its employees but to increase the overall efficiency and safety of their plant.

Posted: November 13, 2017, 5:00 am
The Chemical Safety Board (CSB) may be preparing to take a significant step backwards in its advocacy for worker participation in preventing chemical facility incidents, including catastrophes like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In April, 2016 the CSB unanimously approved a 4-volume “Macondo Investigation Report” in response to the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon blowout that killed 11 workers, injured 17 and spilled 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The report contained a number of recommendations, including four recommendations calling for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) to significantly enhance its regulations requiring worker participation in the employer’s safety program, and enhanced whistleblower protections for workers participating in safety activities.
Posted: November 10, 2017, 5:00 pm

OSHA’s Control of Hazardous Energy standard -- the Lockout-Tagout rule -- addresses the safety of employees engaged in servicing and maintenance activities in general industry when exposure to the unexpected release of hazardous energy is possible.

Posted: November 6, 2017, 5:00 am
On the heels of an incident in which a worker was injected with a flammable propellant gas, OSHA has reached agreements with three Massachusetts packaging companies to correct workplace hazards and enhance safety. OSHA found that Dudley- based Shield Packaging Co. Inc. – which packages aerosol containers – failed to implement required procedures to lock out the machine's power sources or train the employee on how to recognize and avoid the hazard.
Posted: November 3, 2017, 6:00 pm

'Method of Testing the Performance of Industrial Pulse Cleaned Dust Collectors,' provides a way to accurately assess and compare self-cleaning dust collection systems. These are systems that use compressed air to discharge the dust cake from the filter without taking the air filter off line.

Posted: November 1, 2017, 4:00 am

Loading docks are flooded with potential danger, and without the proper training, procedures, equipment, and maintenance they are liable to deliver disaster at every turn.

Posted: November 1, 2017, 4:00 am
With extreme weather and its effects increasingly in the headlines, a new survey reveals what worries workers when it comes to power outages. An online poll among 2,072 U.S. adults ages 18 and older commissioned by Cintas Corporation found that more than a third (34 percent) would not feel very confident in their ability to navigate the building safely.
Posted: October 27, 2017, 4:00 pm
OSHA has again cited a Moonachie, New Jersey hair distribution company, and proposed $181,280 in penalties, after finding continued safety hazards at the employer's warehouse. The agency initiated an inspection of Mane Concept’s facility in April after receiving a complaint alleging imminent safety hazards.
Posted: October 26, 2017, 4:00 pm

There’s an increasing rate of change in the weather right now. From hurricanes to earthquakes to tropical storms, they are all a force of direct urgency with consequences on both commercial and social aspects.

Posted: October 23, 2017, 4:00 am
Dan Zak of the Washington Post has written a long feature article on the impact and aftermath of the West fertilizer explosion that killed 15 people, injured 252 and damaged or destroyed 500 buildings in the small town of West Texas on April 17, 2013.
Posted: October 18, 2017, 6:00 pm
The U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) has released an eight minute safety video entitled “Fire in Baton Rouge” detailing the agency’s Key Lessons stemming from the 2016 fire at the ExxonMobil Refinery that seriously injured four workers. The video includes a new four minute animation explaining the events leading up to the incident.
Posted: October 17, 2017, 6:00 pm
The Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Administration (TOSH) is investigating last week’s explosion at an Eastman Chemical in Kingsport, Tennessee that released potentially toxic chemicals into the air.
Posted: October 9, 2017, 12:00 pm

Safety data sheet information is not always clear about the hazards represented by a material or its ingredients. How do EHS leaders identify problematic documents and acquire the information necessary for effective decision-making about materials on site, exposure and worker protection?

Posted: October 2, 2017, 2:00 pm
With the Atlantic Hurricane Season in full swing through November, the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) and the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI) are working to spread awareness of a less recognized, yet more frequent weather hazard: lightning.
Posted: September 26, 2017, 2:00 pm
Florida Power & Light Co.’s 10,000-square-foot Riviera Beach Command Center is essentially Florida’s Fort Knox. It’s made of layers of concrete block that can withstand Category 5 winds of 157 mph and higher.
Posted: September 18, 2017, 4:00 am
With many people still without power in areas hit by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) is providing the following safety tips for homeowners:
Posted: September 15, 2017, 4:00 pm
After spending a year in prison on charges related to one of the nation’s worst mining disasters, former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has taken to TV to plead his innocence. In a series of television ads running in West Virginia, Blankenship, who was convicted of conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards, is now blaming the Mining Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) for the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster that killed 29 miners.
Posted: September 12, 2017, 4:00 am

Environmental and Occupational Health

Environmental and Occupational Health features news, studies and emerging developments relating to health.

When is asking employees about their illness OK, what caused a cargo ship to sink during a hurricane and which category of first responder saw on-the-job injuries decrease sharply last year? These questions were answered by the stories featured on ISHN.com this week.
Posted: December 16, 2017, 5:00 am
While health concerns are usually considered private matters, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wants restaurant managers to talk to employees who are ill, to make sure they don’t spread foodborne illness to co-workers and customers. It’s a significant problem. Nearly half of restaurant-related outbreaks are caused by sick food workers. Managers may be hesitant to ask their employees about symptoms and diagnoses, especially since that conversation might lead to workers missing work and forgoing pay.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 5:00 pm
A new compilation of articles published in the November issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, describes an effort led by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop and evaluate clinical decision support (CDS) designed to assist primary care clinicians’ with care of their working patients using CDS tools in electronic health records.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
Methylene chloride kills. We wrote about 21-year old Kevin Hartley last June. He died last April 29 — Workers Memorial Day — while when he was overcome by methylene chloride while stripping a bath tub. Seventeen workers have died from over-exposure to methylene chloride between 2000 and 2015, and probably at least as many consumers. “Methylene chloride is too dangerous to keep on the store shelves,” said Dr. Robert Harrison of the University of California San Francisco. He says in a small room, just a half gallon’s worth of product containing that chemical can lead to a buildup of vapors that can prove lethal in less than an hour.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 7:00 pm
American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) Executive Director Dennis Hudson has been honored with the President’s Distinguished Service Award by the U.K.-based Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). The presentation occurred in November at the IOSH annual conference in Birmingham, England. The award honors the work and achievements of individuals who have made significant contributions to IOSH or the occupational safety and health profession for several years.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 3:00 pm
Flu vaccine options, an engine failure that threatens passengers’ safety and food safety during the holidays were among the stories featured on ISHN.com this week.
Posted: December 9, 2017, 5:00 am
In October 2017 we published the first blog in a series to highlight musculoskeletal health research at NIOSH. With the holiday season upon us, this next installment will take the opportunity to discuss how best to promote musculoskeletal health in retail establishments to reduce the incidence of musculoskeletal disorders among temporary retail workers.
Posted: December 8, 2017, 7:00 pm
The wildfires raging throughout Southern California right now are taking life, destroying property, and endangering people who are tasked with performing response and recovery operations. During a wildfire, workers may be caught in circumstances that require them to quickly evacuate. The Ready.gov - Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) website offers guidance on what to do during a wildfire if in a vehicle, in a residence, or out in the open.
Posted: December 8, 2017, 5:00 am
Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is usually produced by an industrial process. Cr(VI) is known to cause cancer. In addition, it targets the respiratory system, kidneys, liver, skin and eyes. Chromium metal is added to alloy steel to increase hardenability and corrosion resistance.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 pm
One person was transported to the hospital after an accident at a warehouse caused an explosion in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, fire officials say.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
Welders are at particularly high risk for eye injuries. A Canadian study reported that welders represented 21% of all eye injury claims. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), welders, cutters, and welding machine operators held about 521 000 jobs in 2000. The welding process exposes workers to a number of sources of mechanical, radiant, thermal, or chemical energy.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
Welders in a shop in Augusta, Georgia, were welding a plate onto the outside of a non-pressurized waste water collection tank in preparation for installing a hand rail. The atmosphere was tested surrounding the tank, but the inside was not. The welders didn't know what the gas buildup was, but the air in the tank was combustible. One of the victims in the explosion that occurred at the DSM Resins plant in September, 2017, was working inside a tank when the explosion happened.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
What activities and circumstances are proximal to a welding-related occupational eye injury? Researchers categorized and described the activity, initiating process, mechanism of injury, object and/or substance, and the use of protective eyewear from the narrative text data reported for each injury.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals last week dismissed an appeal by CONSOL Energy that sought to overturn a federal judge’s decision requiring CONSOL to continue paying for health care benefits to some 3,400 retired miners, their dependents and widows. Judge David A. Faber of the Federal Court for Southern West Virginia in Bluefield found CONSOL was attempting to violate a collective bargaining agreement requirement to pay for lifetime health care benefits for retirees.

Posted: December 4, 2017, 7:00 pm
Substandard conditions in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey have impacted workers’ health and safety on the job, as well as their wages according to a devastating new report from from the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) and University of Illinois Chicago that surveyed 360 workers. The report also offers recommendations for improving working conditions during post-disaster recovery operations. Hurricanes and other disasters present a major challenge for OSHA and other local and national government agencies dedicated to protecting workers during recovery operations.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 5:00 pm
Scott Mugno, President Trump’s choice to head the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, will go before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee next Tuesday at 10:00 am for his confirmation hearing. Mugno is Vice President for Safety, Sustainability and Vehicle Maintenance at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh and was formerly Managing Director for FedEx Express Corporate Safety, Health and Fire Protection in Memphis. You can watch it LIVE here.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 pm
Hayden McClure didn’t know he had cancer – didn’t know he was even at risk – until he took the test offered by the Building Trades National Medical Screening Program. It saved his life. McClure, a member of Anchorage, Alaska, Local 1547, worked on a Department of Energy site at Amchitka Island that qualified him for the free medical screening.
Posted: November 29, 2017, 5:00 am
‘Workplaces are not merely spaces where people work – they are spaces where people live their lives. Anything which would be prohibited on grounds of consumer health or environmental protection should also be prohibited in workplaces.’ These were the words with which Laurent Vogel, a researcher at the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI), closed the ‘Work and Cancer’ conference organised by the ETUI in November in Brussels.
Posted: November 28, 2017, 5:00 am
The entire 22-member Editorial Board of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health resigned this morning after a months-long struggle with the Journal’s new owners who have “have acted in a profoundly unethical fashion” and have moved the worker-oriented publication to a more corporate focus.
Posted: November 27, 2017, 5:00 pm
Cal/OSHA has cited six employers $241,950 for workplace safety and health violations after reports that workers contracted Valley Fever on a solar project construction site in Monterey County. Valley Fever is caused by a microscopic fungus known as Coccidioides immitis, which lives in the top two to 12 inches of soil in many parts of the state. When soil is disturbed by digging, driving, or high winds, fungal spores can become airborne and may be inhaled by workers.
Posted: November 24, 2017, 5:00 am
OSHA has cited Tampa Electric Co. and Critical Intervention Services, a security services provider, for $43,458 in total proposed penalties, following a release of anhydrous ammonia – a chemical refrigerant – at its Gibsonton facility. OSHA responded to the incident on May 23, 2017 and determined that the ammonia release occurred when a relief valve activated after a pipeline became over pressurized. As a result, four workers were taken to the hospital for observation and released.
Posted: November 23, 2017, 5:00 am
What is "indoor air quality"? Indoor air quality (also called "indoor environmental quality") describes how inside air can affect a person's health, comfort, and ability to work. It can include temperature, humidity, lack of outside air (poor ventilation), mold from water damage, or exposure to other chemicals. Currently, OSHA has no indoor air quality (IAQ) standards but it does provide guidelines about the most common IAQ workplace complaints.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 5:00 am
President Trump’s nomination of R. Alexander Acosta to be secretary of labor was approved by a Senate committee, even though the nominee’s (confirmation hearing) testimony had left unclear whether he would be more interested in protecting employers’ prerogatives than in guarding workers’ interests.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 5:00 am
Look for signs of a possible leak: • Persistent bubbling in standing water • Discolored or dead vegetation around the pipeline area • Dense white cloud or fog • Slight mist of ice • Unexplained frozen ground near the pipeline Listen for any unusual noise: • Whistling, hissing or roaring sound
Posted: November 22, 2017, 5:00 am
Chemistry professor Katherine Mirica and Dartmouth former postdoctoral fellow and senior scientist at technology startup C2Sense Merry Smith have developed a conductive smart fabric capable of detecting and protecting users from toxic gases. The innovation, named “Self-Organized Framework on Textiles,” improves on a previous sensor technology-related project that Mirica and Smith previously collaborated on, Mirica said.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 5:00 am
Control banding is an assessment method that can be used to manage workplace risks. It is a process that matches, for example, a control measure (e.g., ventilation, engineering controls, containment, etc.) to a range or "band" of hazards (e.g., skin/eye irritation, very toxic, carcinogenic, etc.). The control banding method also groups chemicals according to similar physical or chemical characteristics, how the chemical will be handled or processed, and what the anticipated exposure is expected to be.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 5:00 am
U.S. Coast Guard recovery teams in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are hard at work locating, assessing and retrieving vessels that were sunken and damaged by Hurricanes Maria and Irma. The task is an urgent one, since leaking oil, fuel and hazardous materials pose a significant threat to the environment and human health. The EPA is assisting in the effort, coordinating with federal, commonwealth, territory, and local partners.
Posted: November 21, 2017, 5:00 pm
A California jury today rejected claims that Johnson & Johnson and its talc supplier were responsible for the deadly cancer of a woman who blamed her illness on breathing asbestos fibers from contaminated body powders. On a 9-3 vote, the jury in Pasadena absolved J&J of negligence in the sale of Johnson’s Baby Powder and another talc product, Shower to Shower. The Los Angeles Superior Court jury also cleared Imerys Talc America, Inc., a supplier of talc to J&J.
Posted: November 20, 2017, 3:00 pm
Hospital workers who used a disinfectant reported more incidents of work-related wheeze and watery eyes than those who did not use the product. Hospital workers who used a disinfectant reported more health symptoms than workers who did not use the product, reports a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study published in the American Journal of Infection Control.
Posted: November 16, 2017, 3:00 pm
At a private meeting in September, congressional aides asked Rebeckah Adcock, a top official at the Department of Agriculture, to reveal the identities of the people serving on the deregulation team she leads at the agency. Teams like Adcock’s, created under an executive order by President Trump, had been taking heat from Democratic lawmakers over their secrecy. What little was publicly known suggested that some of the groups’ members had deep ties to the industries being regulated.
Posted: November 15, 2017, 7:00 pm

Government Regulations

Government Regulations provides the latest information about government regulations that address occupational safety and health issues as well as environment and public health issues.

Changes to school meals proposed this week by the Trump administration are getting praised by school nutritionists and slammed by health experts. Among other things, the interim final rule released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) allows schools to avoid reducing sodium levels in breakfasts and lunches – a mandate introduced by former President Barack Obama. Sodium reduction was to take place in stages through the year 2022.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 7:00 pm
Scott Mugno, President Trump’s choice to head the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, will go before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee next Tuesday at 10:00 am for his confirmation hearing. Mugno is Vice President for Safety, Sustainability and Vehicle Maintenance at FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh and was formerly Managing Director for FedEx Express Corporate Safety, Health and Fire Protection in Memphis. You can watch it LIVE here.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 pm
After multiple delays, OSHA has finally announced that employers who are required to keep OSHA injury and illness records must send summary information in to the agency by December 15, fifteen days after the deadline announced last June, when the agency proposed to delay the reporting deadline from July 1 to December 1.
Posted: November 28, 2017, 3:00 pm
At a private meeting in September, congressional aides asked Rebeckah Adcock, a top official at the Department of Agriculture, to reveal the identities of the people serving on the deregulation team she leads at the agency. Teams like Adcock’s, created under an executive order by President Trump, had been taking heat from Democratic lawmakers over their secrecy. What little was publicly known suggested that some of the groups’ members had deep ties to the industries being regulated.
Posted: November 15, 2017, 7:00 pm
OSHA) last week issued a final rule setting November 10, 2018, as the date for employers in the construction industries to comply with a requirement for crane operator certification. The final rule becomes effective November 9, 2017.
Posted: November 14, 2017, 5:00 pm
New California rules aimed at curbing the surprising amount of pollution coming from leaf blowers, lawn mowers and other small gas-powered machines cleared a final hurdle Monday, and are set to take effect on Jan. 1. The requirements mark another step in the state’s long-running battle to reduce emissions from a category of small engines that have come to rival cars as a source of smog-forming pollution.
Posted: November 14, 2017, 3:00 pm
Reviews continue to pour in about President Trumps long delayed nomination of Scott Mugno to be the next Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA. In addition to my original post, we have already checked in with Katie Tracy at the Center for Progressive Reform and on the business side, Eric Conn of the law firm Conn Maciel Carey. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, which will consider Mugno’s nomination, issued a rather cautious statement:
Posted: November 10, 2017, 7:00 pm
The Chemical Safety Board (CSB) may be preparing to take a significant step backwards in its advocacy for worker participation in preventing chemical facility incidents, including catastrophes like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In April, 2016 the CSB unanimously approved a 4-volume “Macondo Investigation Report” in response to the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon blowout that killed 11 workers, injured 17 and spilled 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The report contained a number of recommendations, including four recommendations calling for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) to significantly enhance its regulations requiring worker participation in the employer’s safety program, and enhanced whistleblower protections for workers participating in safety activities.
Posted: November 10, 2017, 5:00 pm
In what the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is calling “a major victory for public health,” the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) voted 3-2 last week, to ban several harmful phthalate chemicals from plastic used in children’s toys and child care articles. Phthalates are commonly used as a plastic softener in children’s toys and child care articles, such as teething rings.
Posted: October 26, 2017, 2:00 pm
The poultry industry and Republican lawmakers are urging the Trump administration to make a change that could have profound implications for both worker safety and food safety.
Posted: October 17, 2017, 4:00 am
President Trump’s plan to end a key Affordable Care Act (ACA) subsidy will cause health care premiums to spike and insurers to exit the market according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), which estimated that the action would cause the federal budget deficit to rise by $6 billion next year and by $26 billion by 2026.
Posted: October 13, 2017, 2:00 pm
The Massachusetts Senate moved a step closer yesterday to joining 26 other states in extending OSHA safety standards to public sector workers. Bill S.2167, which has yet to be voted on by the Massachusetts House, would ensure that all state and local government workers are protected by the OSHA standards, which apply only to private sector workers.
Posted: October 10, 2017, 4:00 am
EPA chief Scott Pruitt announced Monday that he will sign the paperwork to repeal the Clean Power Plan, an Obama administration rule to combat climate change rule by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from coal and natural gas power plants.
Posted: October 9, 2017, 6:00 pm
The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) says Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has missed the statutory deadline to report to the American people which U.S. counties exceed the national health standard for ground-level ozone, or smog.
Posted: October 6, 2017, 6:00 pm
If you were hoping to view the Statue of Liberty or Mount Rushmore by air – via your drone – you’re out of luck. At the request of U.S. national security and law enforcement agencies, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is prohibiting drones from flying within 400 feet of a number of national monuments.
Posted: October 2, 2017, 7:00 pm
The food industry is cheering and health experts are jeering the USDA’s announcement on Friday that it is proposing to push new nutrition label requirements back by a year and a half.
Posted: October 2, 2017, 5:00 pm
A move last week by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) will delay enforcement of OSHA’s silica rule for the construction industry for another 30 days – to Oct. 23. The DOL said the delay was necessary because of the “dramatic” reduction in the exposure limit – from 250 to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, averaged over an eight-hour shift.
Posted: September 28, 2017, 2:00 pm
While the new headlines are all about Hurricanes, health care, North Korea and tax “reform,” chickens around the country are getting more and more nervous as the foxes quietly move into the government agencies that are supposed to be protecting them.
Posted: September 22, 2017, 6:00 pm
Five years after starting his first job with a landscaping crew in the suburbs of Seattle, Fredi Dubon decided he had enough and called it quits. The work days were long, sometimes 12 hours, but a bigger problem was having to inhale exhaust from his gas-powered leaf blower.
Posted: September 20, 2017, 7:47 pm
Washington observers say the Trump administration is planning to replace the EPA’s rule to limit emissions from coal-fired power plants with one that’s more industry friendly.
Posted: September 15, 2017, 4:00 pm
More than 80,000 individual drones have been registered for commercial and government purposes and more than 60,000 people have obtained a Remote Pilot Certificate required to operate a drone, since the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) small unmanned aircraft rule, Part 107 (PDF), went into effect a year ago.
Posted: September 14, 2017, 4:00 am
In response to a call for comments, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) is strongly urging the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to retain those portions of the proposed rule on occupational exposure to beryllium that deal with medical surveillance, medical removal, and other ancillary standards for both construction and shipyard workers.
Posted: September 7, 2017, 4:00 pm
In an increasingly familiar scenario, OSHA is considering pushing a regulatory compliance date forward into the future in order to “address stakeholder concerns.”
Posted: September 1, 2017, 4:00 pm

The Trump administration’s drive to deregulate the American economy and workplaces means the occupational health and safety profession faces an inescapable moment of truth.

Posted: September 1, 2017, 4:00 am

Occupational health experts are criticizing the U.S. Department of Transportation’s decision to withdraw a rule that would have required workers in safety sensitive jobs to be screened for a sleep disorder that could affect their work performance.

Posted: August 24, 2017, 6:00 pm
Employers who attempt to access OSHA’s electronic injury and illness reporting portal are being greeted by the following message: Alert: Due to technical difficulties with the website, some pages are temporarily unavailable.
Posted: August 21, 2017, 2:00 pm
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may undermine its own recently released “deeming rule” with an exception – one which has the American Heart Association (AHA) warning about loopholes.
Posted: July 31, 2017, 2:00 pm
July marks the first time that drivers in Nevada have been required to give wide berth to Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) workers, thanks to the “Move Over” Law that took effect on July 1.
Posted: July 26, 2017, 2:00 pm
The Office of Management and Budget released its Spring (very, very late Spring) Regulatory Agenda yesterday. The Regulatory Agenda is what it sounds like: a plan and timeline for each agency’s regulations, what the next steps are and when they are expected. The Regulatory Agenda is released every Spring and Fall.
Posted: July 25, 2017, 4:00 pm

The spring regulatory agenda released last week by the Trump administration showed the president making further inroads into dismantling a regulatory environment that he described during his campaign as “burdensome” to business.

Posted: July 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

Occupational Safety

Learn about the latest safety issues affecting various industries.

A Tulsa, Oklahoma safety services company doesn’t just talk the talk. Having just achieved one million man-hours without a recordable injury, JCL Service Company apparently walks the walk, too. Both divisions of the JCL company—JCL Safety Services and JCL Risk Services—reached this safety milestone by completing over one million man-hours without any of the following injury-related incidents occurring: days off work, restricted work, transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, loss of consciousness, or an injury resulting in death.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 7:00 pm
COSHCON17 — The Young and the Active — The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, the umbrella group of all the nation’s COSH groups held its annual conference last week and I was privileged to be able to chair a very moving panel on “Lessons from Workplace Fatalities” with some of my heroes: family activist Katherine Rodriguez, whose father, Ray Gonzales was killed in a fire at BP Texas City in 2004, Tonya Ford, director the United Support and Memorial for Workplace Fatalities, whose uncle Robert “Bobby” Fitch fell to his death at an Archer Daniel Midland plant in 2009, and Jonathan Karmel, author of Dying to Work: Death and Injury in the American Workplace.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 3:00 pm
The 62,085 injuries to U.S. firefighters in 2016 reflected an 8.8 percent decrease from 2015, making this the lowest rate of injury since 1981 – the year the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) began analyzing firefighter injury data. The latest data from the NFPA, released as part of the latest edition of its “U.S. Firefighter Injuries” report, show that the leading injury types in 2016 were: Strains, sprains and/or muscular pains (52.6 percent), and wounds, cuts, bleeding, and bruising (15.2 percent).
Posted: December 13, 2017, 3:00 pm
R.C. Bigelow ("Bigelow") is a family-owned company headquartered in Fairfield, Connecticut, that produces and markets blended teas. The company was founded in 1945 by Ruth Campbell Bigelow, who started her company with "Constant Comment" blended tea, which remains popular today. The R.C. Bigelow facility in Boise, Idaho, is one of two bagging, packaging, and distribution facilities. The company employs approximately 60 workers at the Boise facility and 320 corporate-wide.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 5:00 am
OK, now that the dust has settled, what do we think about the performance of OSHA Assistant Secretary nominee Scott Mugno after listening to his testimony at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday (and Tweeting it)? Two days after the hearing, there hasn’t been much press coverage. Business Insurance headlined its article “OSHA director nominee faces tough questions at confirmation hearing,” noting Ranking Member Patty Murray’s concern that “Your record that stands against everything OSHA should stand for.”
Posted: December 8, 2017, 5:00 pm
It appears a welding accident lead to a deadly fire in Clovis, New Mexico. Three people were killed one was seriously injured. “This is one of the largest losses of life we’ve seen,” said Clovis Police Captain Roman Romero. The three deceased are John Sandoval, 54; Robert Elebario, 51; and Billie Grabowsky, 52. Rogelio Hernandez was the only one who survived the fire. He was treated at Plains Regional Medical Center in Clovis. “I asked him what happened and what does he remember, and he said they were just in the shop welding a piece of pipe to a car and they noticed the gas can nearby had caught a spark,” explained Rogelio’s niece, Casandra Hernandez.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 3:00 pm
What activities and circumstances are proximal to a welding-related occupational eye injury? Researchers categorized and described the activity, initiating process, mechanism of injury, object and/or substance, and the use of protective eyewear from the narrative text data reported for each injury.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
One person was transported to the hospital after an accident at a warehouse caused an explosion in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, fire officials say.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
Welders in a shop in Augusta, Georgia, were welding a plate onto the outside of a non-pressurized waste water collection tank in preparation for installing a hand rail. The atmosphere was tested surrounding the tank, but the inside was not. The welders didn't know what the gas buildup was, but the air in the tank was combustible. One of the victims in the explosion that occurred at the DSM Resins plant in September, 2017, was working inside a tank when the explosion happened.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
Welders are at particularly high risk for eye injuries. A Canadian study reported that welders represented 21% of all eye injury claims. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), welders, cutters, and welding machine operators held about 521 000 jobs in 2000. The welding process exposes workers to a number of sources of mechanical, radiant, thermal, or chemical energy.
Posted: December 6, 2017, 5:00 am
Reinforced plastic tarps, commonly called “Blue Roofs,” provide temporary protection for the roofs of homes and other buildings damaged during severe weather such as a hurricane or tornado. However, when employees access roofs to install these tarps, they are at risk of falls, electrocutions, and other hazards. OSHA has issued a new fact sheet containing steps that employers can follow to help keep workers safe.
Posted: December 5, 2017, 3:00 pm
Tree harvesters and processor attachments equipped with hydraulic bar saws cut with great power and speed. When a chain breaks, if a resulting whipping action projects a chain shot link, the link often has a mass, velocity and resultant energy, in some cases enough to reach an operator in a cab, which has potential to cause damage, harm or severe injury. This may be complicated by the remote nature of forestry operations.
Posted: December 4, 2017, 3:00 pm

This article by Elizabeth Floyd Mair of the Altamont Enterprise is a rare summary of a court case involving an employer challenge of an OSHA citation related to the gruesome death of a day laborer who was dragged into a wood-chipper on May 4, 2016. The employer, Tony Watson, owner of Countryside Tree Care, is contesting citations totaling $141,811 related to the death of Justus Booze, a 23-year old day laborer halfway through his first day on the job.

Posted: December 4, 2017, 3:00 pm
Drones v. planes, a free medical screening program and the death of a 14-year-old worker were among the top stories featured on ISHN.com this week.
Posted: December 2, 2017, 5:00 am
A Pennsylvania company willfully exposed its workers to confined space and fall hazards, according to OSHA, which has assessed US Environmental Inc. proposed penalties of $333,756 for a dozen safety violations. The Downingtown company is an integrated industrial energy services firm that serves the energy, petroleum, natural gas, petro-chemical, power, chemical, manufacturing and engineering sectors. Investigators inspected the facility on May 31, 2017, and found that the company failed to implement rescue procedures for employees in confined spaces; provide protective equipment when working in confined spaces; and provide employees with fall protection training and equipment.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 3:00 pm
OSHA and Marshall Pottery, Inc. in Marshall, Texas have reached a settlement agreement including a penalty of $545,160, after the death of an assistant plant manager. On April 16, 2017, investigators determined that the manager was servicing a kiln and became trapped inside when it activated.
Posted: November 30, 2017, 5:00 am
What is systematic review? There are many different types of occupational safety and health questions and a variety of scientific methods to answer them. Systematic review is one method for comprehensively reviewing a body of scientific literature. It is an explicit and transparent process to identify, select, synthesize, and critically appraise the scientific literature relevant to a specific question.
Posted: November 28, 2017, 7:00 pm
Hundreds of people gathered in Farmington, West Virginia on Sunday to commemorate a 49-year-old mining tragedy that killed 78 miners. The solemn ceremony held at Flat Run Memorial honored victims of the November 20, 1968 Farmington mine disaster in the Consol No. 9 coal mine north of Farmington and Mannington. There were 99 miners at work that day when an explosion rocked the mine. The blast was strong enough to be felt in Fairmont, almost 12 miles away. Fires caused by the blast burned for over a week.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 3:00 pm
The MSHA gets a new leader, the high cost of work-related cancer in Europe and a new NIOSH robotics/worker safety center were among the top stories featured on ISHN.com this week.
Posted: November 18, 2017, 5:00 am
Severe burns to a worker have resulted in safety citations being issued to a Montana general contractor and a Wyoming contractor, according to OSHA, which is proposing $249,516 against the two companies. On May 5, 2017, a Coleman Construction Inc. employee suffered third-degree burns when compressed oxygen inside an underground duct caused a fire. The subcontractor was cited for failing to provide mechanical ventilation or an underground air monitoring system, and failing to report the hospitalization of the burned employee in a timely manner. The company faces $189,762 in penalties.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 5:00 pm
In a 3-1 vote, the Chemical Safety Board (CSB) voted yesterday to withdraw recommendations calling for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) to strengthen worker participation requirements and to take measures to prohibit retaliation against workers who use their rights. Chair Vanessa Sutherland, joined by members Manny Ehrlich and Kristen Kulinowski voted to rescind the recommendations despite a spirited defense by Board member Rick Engler who voted to keep the recommendations.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 3:00 pm
An Aberdeen lumber mill has been fined $112,000 for safety violations following the death of a worker last April. Andrew Ward, 41, died when he fell from an elevated platform where he was working to the concrete surface below. An investigation by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) has found and cited Sierra Pacific Industries for seven safety violations at the lumber mill where the incident happened.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 3:00 pm
High hazard industries could be a little less hazardous in the future, if researchers can find a way to thwart the biggest challenge to promising new technology: trees. The same kinds of collision-avoidance technologies used by self-driving cars could help logging and other workers monitor their surroundings through a mobile virtual fence, or geofence, according to NIOSH-funded research at the University of Idaho. Geofences could be used to maintain safe work areas in logging, for instance, by sending alerts of approaching hazards.
Posted: November 17, 2017, 5:00 am
After an audit at a small Pennsylvania manufacturer revealed some safety complacency cropping up in day-to-day operations, the company reached out to OSHA’s On-Site Consultation Program for assistance. The result: McGregor Industries Inc. has been free of recordable injuries since September 2015, is working to find new ways of reducing injuries and has been able to secure better insurance for individual jobsites. Dunmore-based McGregor Industries Inc. fabricates, delivers, and installs light structural and metal products for buildings, artistic projects, and anything requiring the shaping and finishing of metal.
Posted: November 16, 2017, 5:00 pm
President Trump’s controversial choice to head up the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) was confirmed by the U.S. Senate today. The 522-46 vote to approve David Zatezalo was split along party lines. At issue: Zatezalo was chairman and CEO of Rhino Resources at a time when the company earned two “pattern of violations” notices from MSHA due to its safety violations.
Posted: November 15, 2017, 8:00 pm
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has established a new Center for Occupational Robotics Research (CORR) to provide scientific leadership to guide the development and use of occupational robots that enhance worker safety, health, and well-being. Although robots have been used in workplaces for decades, the use of robots that are designed to be used alongside human workers is increasing, as is the likelihood of robot-related deaths, according to NIOSH.
Posted: November 13, 2017, 3:00 pm
Private industry employers reported nearly 48,500 fewer nonfatal injury and illness cases in 2016 compared to a year earlier, according to estimates released yesterday from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). There were approximately 2.9 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses reported by private industry employers in 2016, which occurred at a rate of 2.9 cases per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers.
Posted: November 10, 2017, 5:00 am
Rockford police officer killed after traffic stop ROCKFORD, Ill. — A Rockford police officer was killed in the line of duty, and a man he pulled over was also killed, after the two were involved in a “scuffle” early Sunday, according to officials. Rockford Chief of Police Dan O’Shea said 30-year-old Officer Jamie Cox, who had been on the force for about a year, pulled over 49-year-old Eddie Patterson as he drove a small pickup truck near the northwest suburb around 1 a.m. Sunday.
Posted: November 8, 2017, 3:00 pm

A Marine Corps Air Facility (MCAF) in Quantico, Va. has been recognized for its achievements in workplace safety and health. OSHA Regional Director Richard Mendelson presented MCAF Commanding Officer Lt. Colonel Daniel Murphy with a plaque and flag signifying the facility’s Star Status in OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Programs.

Posted: November 7, 2017, 3:00 pm
A new international standard released by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) classifies mining accidents by type and by cause in an effort to prevent them from happening in the future. Developed by the ISO’s technical committee on mining, ISO 19434 presents a comprehensive mine accidents classification system that lays out a standard scheme for all factors associated with the accidents. It enables a full analysis based on both software systems or manual assessment and uses a common understandable language for communication between all parts involved in safety, health and environment issues in mines.
Posted: November 7, 2017, 5:00 am

Transportation Safety

Transportation Safety covers motor vehicles, railway and air transportation and includes both occupational and non-occupational hazards.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has determined that the operator of a drone that collided with an U.S. Army helicopter failed to see and avoid the helicopter because he was intentionally flying the drone out of visual range and did not have adequate knowledge of regulations and safe operating practices.
Posted: December 15, 2017, 3:00 pm
The deadliest shipping disaster involving a U.S.-flagged vessel in more than 30 years was caused by a captain’s failure to avoid sailing into a hurricane despite numerous opportunities to route a course away from hazardous weather, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) announced during a public meeting Tuesday. The cargo vessel S.S. El Faro sank Oct. 1, 2015, in the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Joaquin, taking the lives of all 33 aboard.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 5:00 am
Each holiday season for the past several years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has received reports from pilots who said they were distracted or temporarily blinded by residential laser-light displays. The FAA's concerns about lasers – regardless of the source – is that they not be aimed at aircraft in a way that can threaten the safety of a flight by distracting or blinding the pilots.
Posted: December 13, 2017, 5:00 pm
The era of driverless vehicles appears to be rapidly approaching, raising a bevy of urgent questions about how to prevent the emergence of new hazards on the nation’s roads. So, how much preparation have federal transportation authorities carried out to meet the challenge of the advent of self-driving cars and trucks? Not nearly enough, according to a new 44-page report by the Government Accountability Office, a Congressional watchdog agency.
Posted: December 7, 2017, 5:00 pm

Engine failure on an American Airlines plane that resulted in serious injuries to a passenger and substantial damage to the aircraft will be the subject of a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) meeting on Jan. 23, 2018. The Boeing 767-300 experienced an uncontained failure of the right engine during the take-off roll at Chicago O’Hare International Airport.

Posted: December 5, 2017, 7:00 pm
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published new data today showing a record-high 221.7 million licensed drivers in the U.S. in 2016, including 41.7 million – or almost one in five – who are 65 years or older. This age group is growing faster than any other, and is far outpacing their teenage counterparts. The largest single-year percentage increase in licensed drivers that year was among those who are between 75-79 years old, increasing by 4.98 percent over the previous year. Except for five states – Michigan, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wyoming – the nation saw increases among licensed drivers in 2016 compared to the previous year.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 7:00 pm
A research team from the Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE) today released a report that concludes that drones that collide with large manned aircraft can cause more structural damage than birds of the same weight for a given impact speed. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will use the research results to help develop operational and collision risk mitigation requirements for drones. ASSURE conducted its research with two different types of drones on two types of aircraft through computer modeling and physical validation testing.
Posted: December 1, 2017, 5:00 am
A traffic accident in Brooklyn, New York last week took the life of a young worker and forever changed that of the driver who killed him. News sources reported that 14-year-old Edwin Ajacalon, who was making restaurant deliveries on his bicycle, was struck by a car and killed on Saturday evening.
Posted: November 29, 2017, 7:00 pm
Data released by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) yesterday revealed that 2,030 more people died in transportation accidents in 2016 than in 2015, with highway fatalities accounting for 95 percent of all transportation fatalities in 2016. The data indicate 39,339 people lost their lives in transportation accidents in 2016, compared to 37,309 who died in 2015. In addition to the increase in highway fatalities, increases were also seen in the marine and railroad sectors, with a slight decrease in aviation fatalities.
Posted: November 22, 2017, 7:00 pm

The National Transportation Safety Board is seeking industry feedback on its draft strategic plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2022, in order to ensure that the agency is “taking the right approach to advancing the mission of improving transportation safety.” The Strategic Plan reflects the NTSB’s priorities for advancing the mission of improving transportation safety by setting three priority strategic goals: safety Leadership: We will continue to serve as a global leader in independent accident investigations, products, and services essential to transportation safety; engagement: We will engage external stakeholders to advance transportation safety and synergy: We will promote agency teamwork, innovation, and engagement to optimize operations.

Posted: November 21, 2017, 5:00 pm
Most general aviation fatal accidents are caused by in-flight loss of control – and many those are caused by factors related to engine failure. Between 2001 and 2010, engine maintenance errors were identified as a contributing factor in 35 of 70 randomly-selected accidents. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would like to help decrease that number.
Posted: November 21, 2017, 5:00 am

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has determined that the April 3, 2016, derailment of Amtrak train 89 near Chester, Pennsylvania was caused by deficient safety management across many levels of Amtrak and the resultant lack of a clear, consistent and accepted vision for safety. A backhoe operator and a track supervisor were killed, and 39 people were injured when Amtrak train 89, traveling on the Northeast Corridor from Philadelphia to Washington on track 3, struck a backhoe at about 7:50 a.m.

Posted: November 15, 2017, 5:00 pm
Today is the 42nd anniversary of the wreck of he Edumund Fitzgerald which sent 29 mariners to a watery grave and was immortalized by Gordon Lightfoot in what was probably the most famous song about a workplace disaster.  WXYZ in Detroit notes that “Of the more than 1000 ships in the graves under the icy waters of the Great Lakes, the Edmund Fitzgerald is still the largest to ever go down.” The 729-foot freighter was caught in storm carrying hurricane-strength winds on Nov. 10, 1975, and sank as it carried a load of iron ore across Lake Superior.  (H/T to Thurman Wenzl for the reminder.)
Posted: November 14, 2017, 7:00 pm
A sleep-deprived driver operating a motorcoach during early morning hours on a California highway caused a crash that killed four of the 24 passengers, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said in a report released yesterday. “Here’s yet another fatal crash involving both a motorcoach carrier with a starkly evident history of safety problems and a severely fatigued driver,” said NTSB Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt.
Posted: November 14, 2017, 5:00 am
The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety (CMVS) is taking up the challenge of communicating to employers and workers about the risks of driving for work and how to avoid motor vehicle crashes. Crash risk affects workers in all industries and occupations, whether they drive tractor-trailers, cars, pickup trucks, or emergency vehicles, and whether driving is a primary or occasional part of the job.
Posted: November 6, 2017, 5:00 am
A common aviation practice intended to save time is putting planes and their passengers in jeopardy, according to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which has issued a Safety Alert 071-17 about the hazard. Intersection takeoffs – where a pilot uses only a portion of the runway instead of the entire length for takeoff – is common, but the NTSB says pilots may not fully understand the potential risks associated with conducting intersection takeoffs.
Posted: November 2, 2017, 2:00 pm
Sleep apnea, fatigue and a poor traffic management plan combined to cause a fatal 2016 collision between a motorcoach and tractor-trailer truck near Palm Springs, California, according to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). The driver of the motorcoach and 12 motorcoach passengers were killed on October 23, 2016 when the speeding motorcoach crashed into a stopped truck on Interstate 10 in the early-morning darkness.
Posted: November 1, 2017, 4:00 am

President Trump this week directed U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao to launch an initiative to safely test and validate advanced operations for drones in partnership with state and local governments in select jurisdictions. The results of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration Pilot Program will be used “to accelerate the safe integration of UAS into the national airspace and to realize the benefits of unmanned technology in our economy,” according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Posted: October 26, 2017, 6:00 pm
In March 2015, Germanwings Flight 9525 crashed into the French Alps, killing all 150 people onboard. An investigation found that the co-pilot deliberately steered the plane into the mountainside. It also revealed that he had a history of depression, although the airline company was unaware of this crucial information.
Posted: October 24, 2017, 4:00 am
In updating its long-standing aviation safety agreement with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cited the importance in international partnerships between aviation regulators in securing safety in the global aviation market. The revised agreement, which was signed on September 22, 2017, includes changes to enhance the risk-based approach to safety by optimizing reliance on each authority’s expertise in aircraft certification through Revision 6 of the Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP).
Posted: October 20, 2017, 6:00 pm
The pilot’s “pattern of poor decision-making” – which was likely exacerbated by the medications he was taking for multiple health problems – led to the July 30, 2016 hot air balloon accident in Texas that killed 15 passengers and the pilot.
Posted: October 18, 2017, 2:00 pm
Fatalities caused by distracted driving decreased in 2016, while deaths related to other reckless behaviors – including speeding, alcohol impairment, and not wearing seat belts – continued to increase, according to new figures released by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
Posted: October 9, 2017, 4:00 pm
It didn’t take long for the National Transportation Safety Board to identify the operator of the drone that collided with an Army UH-60 helicopter east of Staten Island, New York on September 21st, 2017.
Posted: October 6, 2017, 4:00 am
An unmanned, half-mile long train “bomb train” carrying tank-cars full of highly explosive crude oil barrels toward a city where it is doomed to derail on a curve, killing everyone in its wake. Luckily, Denzel Washington and Chris Pine show up to save the city at the last second. Everyone lives happily every after.
Posted: October 4, 2017, 4:00 am
Authorities in Australia have closed the book on a commercial aircraft that went missing three years ago and has never been found. In a final report published yesterday, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) said it would be impossible to determine the cause of the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on March 8, 2014, without finding the remains of the aircraft.
Posted: October 3, 2017, 4:00 pm
If you were hoping to view the Statue of Liberty or Mount Rushmore by air – via your drone – you’re out of luck. At the request of U.S. national security and law enforcement agencies, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is prohibiting drones from flying within 400 feet of a number of national monuments.
Posted: October 2, 2017, 7:00 pm
More than one in every four vehicles being sold by used car giant CarMax are under recall for safety flaws, including some with potentially deadly defects, according to a survey by auto safety groups.
Posted: September 29, 2017, 6:00 pm
Several failures in close succession by a jetliner’s flight crew were the probable cause of Oct. 27, 2016, runway excursion at LaGuardia Airport, according to the National Transportation Safety Board’s final report issued Thursday.
Posted: September 26, 2017, 4:00 am
For the first time, NSC is hosting an Auto Safety Tech Zone on the Expo floor with Ford, Toyota, FCA US and General Motors. All four car manufacturers will display vehicles equipped with cutting edge safety technologies that are paving the way toward advanced driver systems.
Posted: September 24, 2017, 4:00 am
An accident that killed a bus driver and three migrant workers will be the subject of an upcoming National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) meeting in Washington, D.C.
Posted: September 21, 2017, 4:00 pm

Oil and Gas Industry Safety & health

Discussions of key hazards and safety practices in the oil and gas energy extraction and processing industry.

Exxon Mobil Corp. and the federal government have settled a case arising from the company being charged with violating the Clean Air Act due to air pollution violations at eight petrochemical plants in Texas and Louisiana. News sources say the company has agreed to pay a $2.5 million civil penalty related the violations and spend approximately $300 million to install new equipment to improve operation and monitoring of industrial flares at the facilities.
Posted: November 1, 2017, 4:00 pm

It’s been known for years now that driver fatigue is a serious risk – both on and off the job. A study by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute found fatigue was the top cause of driver distractions, representing 20 percent of all motor vehicle accidents. We’re just not getting enough sleep.

Posted: November 1, 2017, 4:00 am
Seven workers were injured last night – five of them critically -- when an oil rig exploded on Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. News sources say the Coast Guard is searching for one person who is still missing. All of the workers suffered blast-type injuries and burns.
Posted: October 16, 2017, 5:00 am

What if we told you that preparing a proactive front-line approach to oil spills could help reduce your overall risk, preventing a minor spill from becoming a major EHS catastrophe?

Posted: October 10, 2017, 4:00 am
IPIECA - the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues – has released a new publication for medical professionals in the industry.
Posted: September 11, 2017, 4:00 am
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) opened the public docket Monday as part of its ongoing investigation of the Aug. 10, 2016, apartment building explosion fueled by natural gas in Silver Spring, Maryland.
Posted: August 16, 2017, 2:00 pm
OSHA and the DJ Basin Safety Council have renewed an alliance to provide oil and gas industry workers in northern Colorado with information, guidance, and training to enhance the industry’s safety culture.
Posted: August 11, 2017, 4:00 am
Cal/OSHA and Chevron have reached a settlement agreement for a comprehensive plan that will improve safety at the Chevron Richmond refinery and for surrounding communities. The agreement meets and exceeds California’s landmark regulation to reduce risk at refineries, which was approved by the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board in May and is currently pending approval by the Office of Administrative Law.
Posted: July 27, 2017, 2:00 pm
A report published recently by the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers (IOGP) shows the need on the part of some companies to make changes, according to the organization.
Posted: July 21, 2017, 4:00 am
IPIECA, the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues, has released the final version of the IPIECA climate change reporting framework. Supplementary guidance for the oil and gas industry on voluntary sustainability reporting (2017) is now available.
Posted: July 12, 2017, 6:00 pm
During 2003–2013, fatality rates for oil and gas extraction workers decreased for all causes of death except those associated with fall events, which increased two percent annually during 2003–2013. To better understand risk factors for these events, CDC examined fatal fall events in the oil and gas extraction industry during 2005–2014 using data from case investigations conducted by OSHA.
Posted: July 6, 2017, 4:00 am

The safety challenges of the 21st century require an integrative approach that brings fresh thinking and sound practices from across industries and among areas of safety specialization.

Posted: June 1, 2017, 4:00 am
While regulations on the federal level are being repealed or delayed, the rulemaking process is still going strong at the state level – as demonstrated by California’s approval last week of a tough new oil refinery safety regulation.
Posted: May 23, 2017, 4:00 am
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has ordered a Texas-based company to stop new drilling on a $4.2 billion project, after one of its pipelines spilled millions of gallons of a lubricant into a half a million square feet of Ohio wetlands.
Posted: May 12, 2017, 6:00 pm
An effort to overturn a rule limiting methane emissions from oil and natural gas drilling has failed in the Senate – a first in the Trump administration’s ongoing effort to repeal Obama administration rules it deems burdensome to business.
Posted: May 10, 2017, 4:00 pm
Investigators from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) are in Firestone, Colorado to examine what’s left of a home that blew up when an abandoned pipeline from a nearby well leaked gas into the basement. The explosion killed two people and left a third badly burned.
Posted: May 8, 2017, 4:00 am
Previous research has shown that fatality rates for oil and gas extraction workers were decreasing for all causes of death except for those associated with falls. (1) A new study from National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, examined risk factors for fatal fall events in this industry during 2005-2014 using data from case investigations conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).
Posted: May 1, 2017, 4:00 pm
Two oil and gas industry associations have partnered to develop a checklist to enable companies to prepare for and respond to events that may cause multiple casualties.
Posted: April 10, 2017, 4:00 am
Operators of twin oil pipelines beneath the waterway where Lakes Huron and Michigan converge insist they remain structurally sound even though an outer layer of protective covering has worn away in some places. Skeptics said the deterioration is further evidence the lines should be shut down.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 pm
The Louisiana Bucket Brigade and DisasterMap.net recently released their latest tally of petrochemical accidents in the state. During the first two weeks of February alone, the environmental group documented 78 such accidents, including 14 on offshore drilling platforms in Louisiana waters. One of the accidents killed a pipeline worker, while another released cancer-causing benzene into the St. James community.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 am
Sunoco Logistics is digging away on its Mariner East 2 pipeline — a project that will quadruple the volume of natural gas liquids flowing across Pennsylvania once the company navigates more than 2,000 streams, wetlands, roads and railways between Western Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia area.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 am
About 70 trains rumble through Spokane each day. Since those trains began hauling flammable crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken region to Western Washington ports and refineries in 2012, state and local attention to rail infrastructure has increased.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 am
Small drones are watching over Houston's oil and gas industry with the help of DataWing, a consulting firm that assists other businesses with their drone departments. The firm trains pilots and helps companies write their safety manuals. DataWing also has its own pilots across the country.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 am
After another year of decreased workplace injuries and fatalities in the North Dakota, industry and officials are doubling down on partnerships they say helped improve safety. OSHA, the state of North Dakota and the MonDaks Safety Network, made up of oil and gas workers in the region, signed a five-year extension of a safety alliance formed in early 2015 on during the North Dakota Safety Council’s Annual Safety & Health Conference.
Posted: March 22, 2017, 4:00 am
The global safety harness market is projected to grow to USD 1,380 million by 2021, at a CAGR of more than 7 percent over the forecast period, according to the latest market study released by Technavio.
Posted: March 21, 2017, 4:00 am
A coalition of residents, tribal leaders, health professionals and environmental advocates are urging Michigan Governor Rick Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette to decommission a pipeline they say poses a threat to the environment and human health.
Posted: March 16, 2017, 6:00 pm
In 1967, the grounding of the Torrey Canyon focused the world's attention on the risks and environmental impact of major marine oil spills. According to IPIECA -- the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues -- the incident became a catalyst for positive change throughout the industry, ushering in new regulations, safer shipping practices, improved preparedness and response and adequate compensation.
Posted: February 2, 2017, 5:00 am
A teenaged oil company employee was killed last week in Tyler County, West Virginia when he was struck by a truck, then pinned between the truck and a sand silo, according to news sources. Nineteen-year-old Hunger D. Osborn was acting as a spotter for a tractor-trailer that was backing up to off-load sand when the accident occurred Thursday morning at an oil well pad.
Posted: January 17, 2017, 7:00 pm
IPIECA-IOGP, the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues, has collaborated with the Drugs and Alcohol Testing Industry Association (DATIA) to develop program elements that can be used to deter the use or misuse of drugs and alcohol in the workplace.
Posted: December 22, 2016, 5:00 am
Six workers were injured – four critically – by a fire last week at the ExxonMobil Refinery in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
Posted: November 28, 2016, 5:00 am

Top OSHA Violations

In this column, ISHN will report in each issue on one of the 12 most frequently cited OSHA standards.

A worker painting an electric maintenance tower comes in contact with an energized power line and falls 70 feet – striking a second employee working on a lower level and causing him to fall as well.
Posted: July 1, 2016, 4:00 am

Training requirement violations occur in nearly every standard included in OSHA’s top 10 violations list, including fall protection, respiratory protection, lockout-tagout, machine guarding and electrical safety.

Posted: June 1, 2016, 4:00 am
Electrical accidents in the workplace can have horrific consequences.
Posted: May 3, 2016, 4:00 am
Lockout/tagout (29 CFR 1910.147) was the fifth most frequently cited OSHA violation during the period October 2014 to September 2015. There were 3,350 citations reported across all industries during that time with $9,686,894 in penalties.
Posted: April 1, 2016, 4:00 am

When engineering control measures aren’t possible or sufficient to reduce exposure to harmful contaminants such as dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, OSHA requires – through its 1910.134 standard1 – that workers be provided with respiratory protection.

Posted: March 10, 2016, 7:00 pm

When engineering control measures aren’t possible or sufficient to reduce exposure to harmful contaminants such as dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, OSHA requires – through its 1910.134 standard1 – that workers be provided with respiratory protection.

Posted: March 1, 2016, 5:00 am
Every year, about 30 million people in the United States are occupationally exposed to hazardous noise. Noise-related hearing loss has been listed as one of the most prevalent occupational health concerns for more than 25 years.
Posted: February 3, 2016, 5:00 am

OSHA standard 1910.305 covers electrical wiring methods, components and equipment for general use.

Posted: December 18, 2015, 5:00 pm

OSHA standard 1910.305 covers electrical wiring methods, components and equipment for general use.

Posted: December 17, 2015, 7:00 pm

OSHA’s respiratory protection standard 1910.0134 was the fourth most-frequently cited rule in fiscal year 2014, a ranking which reflects the importance of respirators among the types of protective equipment for workers who must perform tasks in hazardous environments.

Posted: November 3, 2015, 5:00 am

In fiscal year 2014, OSHA issued 2,396 citations and almost $7 million ($6,891,521)in penalties for violations of its machine guard standard (1910.212), making it the ninth-most violated standard in the time period.

Posted: October 1, 2015, 4:00 am

OSHA’s standard on ladder safety — 1926.1053 — was among the top 10 most-cited violations in fiscal year 2014, with 2,911 citations and 2,267 inspections within that timeframe in all industries.

Posted: August 6, 2015, 4:00 am

OSHA’s standard on ladder safety — 1926.1053 — was among the top 10 most-cited violations in fiscal year 2014, with 2,911 citations and 2,267 inspections within that timeframe in all industries.

Posted: August 3, 2015, 4:00 am

Workers performing tasks while on scaffolding can be exposed to fall hazards involving considerable height, a factor which makes scaffolding-related violations especially serious.

Posted: July 1, 2015, 1:30 pm
Training is an essential component of many of the standards set by OSHA that are most frequently violated year after year.
Posted: June 1, 2015, 4:00 am
Violations related to electrical hazards led to 2,192 citations (from 1,681 OSHA inspections) and a total of $2,817,950 in penalties in 2014, making 1910.303 the eighth most frequently cited standard, according to the agency.
Posted: May 27, 2015, 6:00 pm
Violations related to electrical hazards led to 2,192 citations (from 1,681 OSHA inspections) and a total of $2,817,950 in penalties in 2014, making 1910.303 the eighth most frequently cited standard, according to the agency.
Posted: May 1, 2015, 4:00 am
OSHA standard 1910.147 The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or startup of the machines ,/p>
Posted: April 1, 2015, 4:00 am
OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard Communication Standard was the second most frequently standard cited during fiscal year 2014, right behind fall protection.
Posted: March 3, 2015, 5:00 am
With nearly $20 million in penalties across all industries, fall protection topped the list of OSHA’s most frequently cited standards during fiscal year 2014
Posted: January 5, 2015, 5:00 am
OSHA standard 1910.305 covers electrical wiring methods, components and equipment for general use.
Posted: December 2, 2014, 5:00 am
OSHA penalized employers $1,746,465 for violations of its respiratory protection standard 1910.134 in fiscal year 2013, from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.
Posted: October 29, 2014, 4:00 am
OSHA’s powered industrial truck standard moved up from seventh place to sixth on the agency’s top ten most frequently cited standards for Fiscal 2013
Posted: October 2, 2014, 4:00 am
Here are the stats for machine guard standard (19100212 General requirements for all machines) violations cited by Federal OSHA during the period October 2012 through September 2013
Posted: September 3, 2014, 4:00 am
OSHA’s standard on ladder safety – 1926.1053 – was one of the top ten most frequently cited standards violations in fiscal year 2013
Posted: August 1, 2014, 4:00 am
OSHA stated in 1998 that “many standards promulgated by OSHA explicitly require the employer to train employees in the safety and health aspects of their jobs.
Posted: June 2, 2014, 4:00 am
Total penalty amount proposed by OSHA for violations of the standard for electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry 1910.303 (October 2012 through September 2013).
Posted: May 1, 2014, 4:00 am
Total penalty amount proposed by OSHA for violations of the lockout-tagout standard 1910.0147 (October 2012 through September 2013).
Posted: March 31, 2014, 4:00 am
> Total penalty amount proposed by OSHA for violations of the hazard communication standard 1910.1200.
Posted: March 4, 2014, 5:00 am
Throughout 2014, ISHN will report in each issue on one of the 12 most frequently cited OSHA standards, for fiscal year 2013, ending September 30, 2013.
Posted: February 3, 2014, 5:00 am

Industrial Hygiene

Anticipated, detection, evaluation and control of hazardous conditions (such as excessive noise) and hazardous substances (such as toxic chemicals).

Sheila Eads, President and Chief Executive Officer of ERB Industries was elected Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA), at the association’s Annual Meeting in Arlington, VA. Craig Wallentine, Global Business Development Manager from DowDuPont, was elected Vice Chairman.
Posted: December 14, 2017, 5:00 am
T. Renee Anthony, PhD, CIH, CSP, FAIHA has been selected as the new editor in chief of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (JOEH). Dr. Anthony, an associate professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, will take the reins January 1, 2018.
Posted: November 14, 2017, 5:00 am
Bringing attention to industrial hygienists - “the quiet heroes in every workplace” - through a website and videos rendered in comic book style has resulted in awards for the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA). IHHeroes.org website and the inaugural edition of its IH Heroes comic have both won Gold Awards in the category of Digital Media/Website Nonprofit and Print Media/Publications Book by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP) MarCom Awards.
Posted: November 3, 2017, 4:00 am
ACGIH® is pleased to announce new members for its 2018 Board of Directors and its 2018 Nominating Committee.
Posted: September 27, 2017, 4:00 am
The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA®) has won three dotCOMM awards for its #IAmIH campaign, launched earlier this year. The awards include a platinum dotCOMM award for excellence in documentary filmmaking for its first-ever day-in-the-life documentary on an industrial hygienist, a platinum award for the first-ever #IAmIH comic, and a gold award for the campaign's website, www.ihheroes.org.
Posted: August 22, 2017, 4:00 pm
ACGIH® announced today the release of its two-tier Under Study list pursuant to changes previously made to its TLV®/BEI® Development Process.
Posted: July 26, 2017, 8:00 pm
ACGIH® and its renowned Industrial Ventilation Committee present a popular continuing education course in September. Fundamentals in Industrial Ventilation & Practical Applications of Useful Equations will be held September 18–22, 2017 at the DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Cincinnati-Blue Ash in Cincinnati, Ohio. Earlybirds who register for the course on or before August 21, 2017 will save $100.00.
Posted: July 26, 2017, 4:00 am
The American Industrial Hygiene Association Proficiency Analytical Testing Programs (AIHA PAT) is pleased to announce that they have been granted ISO/IEC 17043:2010 accreditation by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA), after a thorough assessment and review of its quality management system and competence to develop and administer specific proficiency testing protocols.
Posted: July 25, 2017, 1:33 pm
The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA®) will receive two APEX Awards for Publication Excellence through Communications Concepts, Inc. for its IH Professional Pathway™ program . The program won a Grand Award in the Electronic Media category and an Award of Excellence in the category for Campaigns, Programs & Plans - Membership & Customer.
Posted: July 5, 2017, 6:00 pm
In an entertaining series of brief five-minute talks Tuesday morning called Ignite, experts shared stories from their work as an industrial hygienist or tips on how to make the most of your career. In his presentation, Mark Rollins compared his work in industrial hygiene with his love of good beer.
Posted: June 6, 2017, 4:00 am
The Board of Trustees of the American Industrial Hygiene Foundation (AIHF) has selected 51 outstanding students to receive more than $131,800 in scholarships this year. The recipients have distinguished themselves through their commitment to their studies, their communities, and the profession of industrial hygiene.
Posted: May 15, 2017, 4:00 am
The American Industrial Hygiene Association® (AIHA) and the California Industrial Hygiene Council (CIHC) are asking lawmakers in California's State Legislature to ensure that Certified Industrial Hygienists (CIH) have a seat at the table by requiring their membership on the California Toxic Substances Board, which would be created by Senate Bill 774. As currently written, the bill restricts membership on the Board to only one person from any of the following diverse professions: toxicology, chemistry, geology, industrial hygiene, or engineering specific to the statutory responsibilities of the Board.
Posted: April 24, 2017, 6:00 pm
ACGIH® will honor its 2017 Awards recipients at the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce) held June 47, 2017 in Seattle, Washington. Each year, ACGIH® honors individuals and/or groups who have made significant contributions to the profession through their leadership and dedication. This year’s awardees join that distinguished list.
Posted: April 18, 2017, 4:00 am
Today, the American Industrial Hygiene Association® (AIHA) announced the new members of its Board of Directors for 2017. The new Board members will be inducted at AIHA's Annual Business Meeting on Wednesday, June 7, during the 2017 American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce EXP) in Seattle, Wash.
Posted: April 5, 2017, 4:00 am
The 2016 American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce) Virtual Conference has won the Abila Excellence Award-Innovator. The Abila Excellence Awards recognize association, nonprofit, and government customers who have shown exemplary achievement through their use of Abila products.
Posted: March 24, 2017, 4:00 am
The NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards is intended as a source of general industrial hygiene information for workers, employers, and occupational health professionals. The Pocket Guide presents key information and data in abbreviated tabular form for 677 chemicals or substance groupings (e.g., manganese compounds, tellurium compounds, inorganic tin compounds, etc.) that are found in the work environment.
Posted: March 9, 2017, 5:00 am
American Industrial Hygiene Association’s (AIHA®) efforts to grow the next generation of occupational safety and health professionals has gotten a boost in the form of an Innovation Grant from the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) Foundation.
Posted: January 17, 2017, 5:00 pm

Part 1 of 2 - Who is today’s EHS professional?

Entering 2017, your typical EHS pro is a 53-year-old male, a baby boomer, with at least 20 years of experience in the field, primarily practicing in a safety function. He works for a privately-held company and makes $75,000 per year.

Posted: January 13, 2017, 1:56 pm

Part 2 of 2 – EHS forecast for 2017

The bottom line question entering 2017 – and every year – is what do resource allocations look like for EHS departments?

Posted: January 13, 2017, 1:50 pm
Part 1 - Who is today’s EHS professional? Entering 2017, your typical EHS pro is a 53-year-old male, a baby boomer, with at least 20 years of experience in the field, primarily practicing in a safety function. He works for a privately-held company and makes $75,000 per year. In smaller firms, he reports to the CEO or owner. In larger organizations, safety reports to operations and human resources most frequently.
Posted: January 12, 2017, 5:00 am
ACGIH® is pleased to announce new members for its 2017 Board of Directors and its 2017 Nominating Committee. In accordance with a 2013 amendment to the ACGIH® Bylaws, ACGIH®’s membership elected three (3) members to serve as Directors on the Board of Directors. They are:
Posted: November 24, 2016, 5:00 am

How to grow the next generation of occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals was the focus of a recent stakeholder meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) in which the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) was a key participant.

Posted: November 21, 2016, 5:00 pm
The American Industrial Hygiene Foundation (AIHF) is adding personnel to help it with its mission to advance the industrial hygiene profession by awarding scholarships to IH students and those in related disciplines.
Posted: November 14, 2016, 5:00 am
The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) is seeking nominations for its highly coveted Fellow Award, which will be presented at the 2017 American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce), held June 4-7 in Seattle, WA.
Posted: October 21, 2016, 4:00 pm
Today, the American Industrial Hygiene Association® (AIHA) announced that its board of directors has appointed Lawrence "Larry" D. Sloan, CAE as the new CEO, effective October 17, 2016 to lead the largest national association dedicated to protecting worker health.
Posted: August 17, 2016, 4:00 pm
Two prominent members of the American Society of Safety Engineers were appointed to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Board of Scientific Counselors, a federal advisory committee formed to give the NIOSH director advice and guidance.
Posted: August 1, 2016, 4:00 pm
Norman W. Henry, III, CIH, was honored at this year's American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce) with the 2016 AIHA President's Award. This prestigious award, which is determined solely by the president of AIHA, is presented to awardees in recognition of their dedication to the industrial hygiene profession, at the President's Reception held at the annual AIHce.
Posted: June 9, 2016, 2:00 pm
The American Industrial Hygiene Association® (AIHA) inducted Steven E. Lacey, PhD, CIH, CSP, at AIHce as the new President of AIHA's Board of Directors at the Annual Business Meeting on May 26, during the 2016 American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce) in Inner Harbor Baltimore, Md.
Posted: June 2, 2016, 4:00 pm

ISHN noted these trends at the AIHce in Baltimore: • Globalization is alive and well in EHS. Being promoted at the conference is the 2nd China-US Occupational Health Symposium, July 12-13, in Guangzhou, China, and the 2018 International Occupational Hygiene Association meeting in Washington, DC.

Posted: May 23, 2016, 4:00 am
ACGIH® will honor its 2016 Awards recipients at the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition (AIHce) held May 21-26, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland. Each year, ACGIH® honors individuals and/or groups who have made significant contributions to the profession through their leadership and dedication. This year’s awardees join that distinguished list.
Posted: April 5, 2016, 4:00 am

Best Practices

Dan Markiewicz's 30+ years of experience applies best practices to emerging safety and health issues.

OSHA has cut deals with employers and industry associations ever since the agency’s beginning. About one-third of cited employers don’t take OSHA’s deal. They just correct and pay. Will more of this group deal with OSHA in the future?

Posted: December 1, 2017, 5:00 am

Lack of deep cleaning and other actions/inactions help unwanted guests in the room, such as bed-bugs and germs, to multiply and spread to bedding and even packed clothes.

Posted: November 26, 2017, 5:00 am

Your plan must be based on your organization's vision for future safety performance. Frame it as a set of actions that will: Further a safety culture change from reactive to proactive, provide the functioning capability to lead the change, and provide governance requirements to sustain the change.

Posted: October 17, 2017, 4:00 am

There's a great imbalance between the two inseparable forces of safety and health. This imbalance is evident in Table I. The CSP® and the CIH® are the top safety and health credentials in our field. Both pre-date OSHA, and both have grown in quality and value over the years.

Posted: October 13, 2017, 4:00 am

Old pros were trapped in a prescriptive career- the OSHA regulation says this, now do it. Doing it took nearly all of the pro's time. There was little time for best practices. The old pros did, however, build great foundations upon which young pros may leap from compliance practices to conformance objectives.

Posted: September 12, 2017, 4:00 am

My job was on the line. Within minutes after the CEO chewed my ear, I arranged a confidential meeting with the operating company president. I briefed him on the situation, described changes that must occur, and I promised to protect his plant management the best I could.

Posted: August 29, 2017, 4:00 am

To sell something, you often ease the customer into a buying mood. The following will help you convince management to adopt NIOSH’s 2013 Recommended Weight Limits.

Posted: July 30, 2017, 4:00 am

You want to see the OHS profession grow, right?  One way is to increase your engagements with current topics. Let’s explore how this works.

Posted: June 1, 2017, 4:00 am

I approached a couple of employees, and asked if one of them would volunteer to wear an air sampling pump. One employee, "If you tell me who you voted for president, I might wear the pump." I knew at that point that I'd get some honest results from industrial hygiene (IH) sampling.

Posted: May 1, 2017, 4:00 am

Social nocebo1 is a contagious illness that impacts upwards of one-quarter of people who encounter it. Conditions are ripe for a rise of social nocebo in the workplace. The following are key actions that occupational safety and health pros must take to anticipate, recognize, evaluate and control social nocebo.

Posted: April 28, 2017, 6:00 pm

Ivanka Trump’s upcoming (May 2017) book, “Women who work: Rewriting the Rules for Success” contains an unwritten message for the demographic mean 53-year-old male OSH pro: “you need to change with the times.”

Posted: March 1, 2017, 5:00 am

Compliance bias is the belief that U.S. government mandates such as OSHA regulations are sufficient for most organizations to achieve injury and illness prevention objectives. This bias is outdated and dead wrong.

Posted: February 8, 2017, 5:00 pm

Compliance bias is the belief that U.S. government mandates such as OSHA regulations are sufficient for most organizations to achieve injury and illness prevention objectives. This bias is outdated and dead wrong.

Posted: February 1, 2017, 5:00 am

2017 will be a particularly challenging year for occupational safety and health program improvement.

Posted: December 7, 2016, 3:00 pm

2017 will be a particularly challenging year for occupational safety and health program improvement.

Posted: December 1, 2016, 5:00 am
Occupational safety and health pros can participate in these trends while enhancing their safety and health skills.
Posted: October 1, 2016, 4:00 am
The EPA established a final rule on June 13, 2016 (effective compliance date January 1, 2018) to revise reporting requirements under section 311 and 312 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.1
Posted: September 1, 2016, 4:00 am
The following is an overview and summary on how these rules (41 CFR Part 60-20) impact safety and health among the Federal government contractor workforce.
Posted: August 2, 2016, 4:00 am

Passed Congress this spring and awaiting President Obama’s signature, the Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act1 modernizes the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that was the cornerstone of chemical management in the United States

Posted: July 13, 2016, 4:00 pm

Passed Congress this spring and awaiting President Obama’s signature, the Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act1 modernizes the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that was the cornerstone of chemical management in the United States

Posted: July 1, 2016, 4:00 am
Newsflash: None of us are getting out of this world alive. It is just a matter of how and when we die. Can you decipher the medical shorthand below?
Posted: June 1, 2016, 4:00 am
Technology and ingenuity have advanced today where reasonable accommodations may allow almost any worker to be productive and safe while performing almost any job.
Posted: May 3, 2016, 4:00 am

The United Nations Human Rights Council will release a report in June, 2016 to dispel the “myth” that U.S. women enjoy rights and protections under law consistent with international standards

Posted: April 1, 2016, 4:00 am
The jobs in Table S-4 (OSHA 1910.332) face a higher than normal risk of electrical accident if exposed to circuits that operate at 50 volts or more to ground.
Posted: March 1, 2016, 5:00 am
Business hates HR – human resources.
Posted: February 3, 2016, 5:00 am

In 2012, 58 million Americans sought an attorney.1 The median starting salary for new lawyers in 2012 was $61,000 and many new lawyers carry student-loan debts of $125,000.2

Posted: January 5, 2016, 5:00 am

March 2015 research from the Association of American Medical Colleges confirms that the projected physician shortage is “real and significant.”1 The AAMC projects a shortage between 46,000-90,000 physicians by 2025.

Posted: November 29, 2015, 5:00 am

March 2015 research from the Association of American Medical Colleges confirms that the projected physician shortage is “real and significant.”1 The AAMC projects a shortage between 46,000-90,000 physicians by 2025.

Posted: November 3, 2015, 5:00 am

Leirah Jordan, a senior at St. Ursula Academy in Toledo, is considering a career in industrial hygiene and she asked to shadow or meet with me to learn about IH from a seasoned professional.

Posted: October 1, 2015, 4:00 am

In July, 2015, The Lancet, one of the oldest (founded 1823) and one of the most prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, published a series of articles on faith and health.

Posted: September 21, 2015, 6:00 pm

Electrical Safety

Electrical standards compliance, electrical safety tips, electrical safety trends.

An arc flash at the Panda Power station in south Sherman, Texas, sent one employee to the hospital. Sherman Fire says It happened around 7:30 a.m. at 510 Progress Drive in Sherman. The Panda Sherman Power Project is a clean natural gas-fueled, 758-megawatt combined-cycle generating facility. The plant can supply the power needs of up to 750,000 homes.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 pm
Zach Spicer, a substation supervisor for DES, Dickson County, Tenn., suffered second-degree burns to his face and neck and third-degree burns Aug. 25 afternoon on his hands and forearm at the DES Old White Bluff Substation just as he prepared to teach a class. He was accessing a breaker cabinet, high voltage side when contact or an arc formed, causing an electrical fault that released heat and energy.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 3:00 pm
Five to 10 arc flash explosions occur in electric equipment every day in the United States, according to a presentation by Eddie F. Jones, Square D / Schneider Electric, and Progress Energy. This number does not include cases in which the victim is sent to an ordinary hospital. Instead, these incidents are so severe the victims require treatment from a special burn center.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
Electrical contractors are responsible for the health and safety of employees who are exposed to a variety of hazards. Some of these hazards are obvious, such as electrical shock and electrocution. Others, such as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), back injuries, slips and falls, or automobile-related incidents may not be as obvious.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
The US Department of Labor estimates that every day in the United States five to ten Arc Flash Explosions occur on the job. Arc Flashes are incredibly violent and devastating to any worker exposed to the instantaneous phenomenon. Most of the time the exposure will result in serious injury or even death. Electrical equipment is designed to withstand up to a certain amount of current.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
An arc flash occurs during a fault, or short circuit condition, which passes through this arc gap. The arc flash can be initiated through accidental contact, equipment which is underrated for the available short circuit current, contamination or tracking over insulated surfaces, deterioration or corrosion of equipment and, or parts, as well as other causes.
Posted: December 12, 2017, 5:00 am
According to CAGR market research released in December, 2017, one trend in the market is multiple functionalities of arc flash protection equipment. The latest trend in the market is safety equipment with multiple functionalities, i.e., apparel and safety equipment that are not only used for protection against arc flashes but other hazards as well. Vendors offer arc flash protection equipment with a combination of high visibility and flame-resistant (FR) capabilities, providing protection against multi-hazards.
Posted: December 11, 2017, 5:00 am
Severe weather happens year-round. Tornadoes, hurricanes and other storms can seriously damage power lines and other electrical equipment. Storm damage causes dangers that lurk after a storm has passed. Safe Electricity encourages you to be aware of and prepared for those dangers.
Posted: September 18, 2017, 4:00 am
More than 7.1 million customers were without power across Florida and in parts of Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina as a result of Hurricane Irma. As the storm moved through the region, companies were able to address more than 1.25 million outages, due largely to recent investments in energy grid technology and automation.
Posted: September 18, 2017, 4:00 am

Eager to get to that project you’ve been planning – the one that will require you to use power tools? In addition to the obvious hazards (saws cut off about 4,000 fingers in the U.S. each year, for instance), there are electrical hazards that you may not be thinking about – but you should be.

Posted: August 9, 2017, 4:00 am
Industrial work is somewhat known for its risk for injury. However, it's still not something people often think about when actually doing the work that risks so much injury in such a substantial way. There are various ways injuries can happen when doing industrial work.
Posted: August 3, 2017, 4:00 am
A contractor for a Michigan utility company died Wednesday after being electrocuted during what was apparently a routine pole change procedure.
Posted: July 21, 2017, 2:00 pm
With summer in full swing, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) are joining forces to remind people about the potential electrical hazards in swimming pools, hot tubs and spas, on board boats and in the waters surrounding boats, marinas and launch ramps.
Posted: July 14, 2017, 2:00 pm
An arc flash at the Panda Power station in south Sherman, Texas, sent one employee to the hospital. An employee was de-energizing on a breaker when an arc flash occurred. The accident happened around 7:30 a.m.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 8:00 pm
Two people were injured in an industrial accident at Offutt Airforce Base near Bellevue, Nebraska. The injured were working on an electrical circuit around 2:30 p.m. when the accident occurred.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 7:00 pm
Arc flash generally refers to the dangerous exposure to thermal energy released by an arcing fault on an electrical power system. In recent years, arc flash hazards have become a prominent safety issue in many industries.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
A journeyman electrician and an electrical helper were at a worksite to install a new three-phase run of wire between an existing energized 480-volt circuit breaker panel and a new piece of machinery. During the process, the journeyman electrician attempted to install a missing bolt from a breaker mount on an energized 480-volt bus bar.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
An electric arc flash injured a worker at a power generating facility. When the arc flash occurred, a 48-year-old electrician was working on an electrical cabinet that was still powered. The wiring contractor employee suffered second and third-degree burns to his hands, arms and torso.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
Did you know the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO) adopted a new symbol meaning “to warn of an arc flash”? Many workers die each year as a result of arc flash explosion accidents – and most are killed because they failed to wear proper PPE.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
In general, the employer must: Assess the workplace to identify employees exposed to hazards from flames or from electric arcs; Make reasonable estimates of the incident heat energy of any electric-arc hazard to which an employee would be exposed;
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
Electricity can cause two types of burns: electrical burns from direct contact with current and thermal burns from arc flashes and blasts. An arc flash occurs when powerful, high-amperage currents travel, or arc, through the air. This can occur when high voltage differences exist across a gap between conductors.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
It is estimated that 5 to 10 arc flash explosions occur in electric equipment every day in the United States. In the mining industry the largest single injury category of electrical injuries are caused by non-contact electrical arcs.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
In the first case study, an electrician was working on a circuit breaker panel that he thought was deenergized. After completing the work, the electrician was closing one of the enclosure doors when an arc flash occurred.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission undertook a special inspection at Florida Power & Light’s Turkey Point nuclear power plant to assess the failure of a safety-related electrical bus that resulted in the plant declaring an alert.
Posted: June 9, 2017, 4:00 am
Just in time for National Electrical Safety Month – May -- the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) is launching its annual effort to help reduce electrically-related fatalities, injuries, and property loss. This year’s campaign theme is "Decoding the National Electrical Code® (NEC) to Prevent Shock and Electrocution," which features resources to help protect against common electrical hazards.
Posted: April 24, 2017, 4:00 am
Flash fire, arc flash and other thermal hazards pose a significant safety threat in a variety of workplaces. Recognizing the key causes of these hazards in industrial settings — as well as wearing the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) — can go a long way toward reducing worker injuries. In light of this, Workrite Uniform Company, a flame-resistant (FR) clothing manufacturer, encourages all industrial personnel to pay careful attention to the following common fire starters and implement proper safety measures.
Posted: March 10, 2017, 5:00 am

How much do you know about electrical safety? Take this brief quiz provided by AVO Training Institue and test your personal knowledge.

Posted: March 7, 2017, 5:14 pm
AIHce 2017 is offering TWO Professional Development Courses (PDCs) in electrical safety. This year, participants will have the option of taking either one or both of the electrical safety courses being offered: Electrical Safety I (Basic Principles/Engineering Controls) and Electrical Safety II (Energized work practices/NFPA 70E).
Posted: January 31, 2017, 5:00 am
In a survey of 500 people working in fields exposed to arc flash and flash fire, 38 per cent did not wear flame resistant (FR) clothing for work. The most prominent reason was that the clothing was not provided by their workplace (38 per cent), with other reasons including being expensive, uncomfortable, or too hot.
Posted: December 6, 2016, 5:00 am
A brief explosion created by an "arc flash" from a 600-volt electrical panel that seriously injured a Ware River Power Inc. (Massachusetts) employee was accidental, investigators from the state fire marshal's office have concluded.
Posted: December 6, 2016, 5:00 am